Butterfly Field Guide Books A good field guide is essential to identifying what ever thing, plant or animal you are looking for. These books mainly concern themselves with identifying Butterflies, Caterpillars and Moths. We personally have three different guides from Audubon. There is a book about Butterfly peculiarities and uniqueness, another about people’s fascination and obsession with Butterflies and one in a more relaxed style than a formal, technical guide.  National Audubon Society Pocket Guide to Familiar Butterflies Of North America Author  National Audubon Society Product Description  Filled with succinct descriptions and dazzling photographs, the National Audubon Society Pocket Guide to Familiar Butterflies in North America is designed to be compact enough for nature-lovers to easily bring along when observing butterflies. This streamlined volume contains: a simple field guide identifying 80 of the most widespread butterflies in North America and a complete overview of observing butterflies, covering basic identifying field marks and practical tips for observing and distinguishing different butterflies. This pocket guide is packed with information; bright photographs capturing the butterflies perched with their wings spread and closed; specific descriptions of each species’ important identifying characteristics, life cycle, habitat and range, line drawings depicting the basic butterfly anatomy, a description of major butterfly groups and a glossary of technical terms. When observing these beautifully fragile creatures, the National Audubon Society Guide to Familiar Butterflies of North America is an excellent and handy reference guide to take along during any nature walk.Caterpillars of Eastern North AmericaAuthor  David Wagner ReviewA lusciously photographed book generally regarded as the most comprehensive field guide ever to caterpillars, as opposed to their better-documented adult forms–moths and butterflies. . . . In the book, the fruit of a decade’s research, Dr. Wagner . . . argues passionately that creeping things can be every bit as mesmerizing and transporting as those that flit and dart in the air.

— Andy Newman, New York Times This is a wonderful field guide for those interested in studying the fascinating world of caterpillars in the backyard, parks, woods and fields around us.

— Robert E. Hoopes, Wildlife Activist David Wagner has produced a user-friendly field guide that goes well beyond anything else available.

— The Quarterly Review of Biology As a teacher of the university courses in insect biology and classification, I will use this book heavily; yet it is attractive and simply written enough to be much more widely appealing for children, teachers, and indeed anyone with interest in naturally history. David Wagner is to be congratulated for communicating his knowledge of the Lepidoptera so clearly and appealingly to the rest of us.

— J.B. Whitfield, Annals of the Entomological Society of America In general, the images of caterpillars and adults in this book are superb, the layout is attractive and easy to use, and the small-size format allows it to slip easily into a backpack for use in the field. I strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in Lepidoptera, but it should also find a place on the bookshelf of anyone interested in natural history, plant-insect interactions, or management of Lepidoptera pests (macros, anyway). It also will be very handy for anyone with inquisitive children (of any age) that pose that frequently asked question–What will it turn into?

— John W. Brown, Proceeds of the Entomological Society of Washington This is a fine, easy-to-use book that is sure to be in the hands of everyone interested in exploring their own gardens or nearby vacant lots, written to be understood by middle-school students as well as professionals. Very highly recommended!

— Biology Digest ReviewThis book adds to our understanding of caterpillars by providing a means to identify common caterpillars via excellent photos of early stages that are associated with photos of adults, and through snippets of natural history text for each species. This alone will generate enthusiasm for caterpillars among professional biologists and general readers interested in Lepidoptera. (Philip J. DeVries, Department of Biological Sciences, University of New Orleans, author of “The Butterflies of Costa Rica and Their Natural History, Volumes I and II” ) –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Product DescriptionThis lavishly illustrated guide will enable you to identify the caterpillars of nearly 700 butterflies and moths found east of the Mississippi. The more than 1,200 color photographs and two dozen line drawings include numerous exceptionally striking images. The giant silk moths, tiger moths, and many other species covered include forest pests, common garden guests, economically important species, and of course, the Mescal Worm and Mexican Jumping Bean caterpillars. Full-page species accounts cover almost 400 species, with up to six images per species including an image of the adult plus succinct text with information on distribution, seasonal activity, food plants, and life history. These accounts are generously complemented with additional images of earlier instars, closely related species, noteworthy behaviors, and other intriguing aspects of caterpillar biology. Many caterpillars are illustrated here for the first time. Dozens of new food plant records are presented and erroneous records are corrected. The book provides considerable information on the distribution, biology, and taxonomy of caterpillars beyond that available in other popular works on Eastern butterflies and moths. The introductory chapter covers caterpillar structure, life cycles, rearing, natural enemies, photography, and conservation. The section titled “Caterpillar Projects” will be of special interest to educators. Given the dearth of accessible guides on the identification and natural history of caterpillars, Caterpillars of Eastern North America is a must for entomologists and museum curators, forest managers, conservation biologists and others who seek a compact, easy-to-use guide to the caterpillars of this vast region. A compact guide to nearly 700 caterpillars east of the Mississippi, from forest pests to garden guests and economically important species 1,200 color photos and 24 line drawings enable easy identification Full-page species accounts with image of adult insect for almost 400 species, plus succinct text on distribution and other vital information Many caterpillars illustrated here for the first time Current information on distribution, biology, and taxonomy not found in other popular works A section geared toward educators, “Caterpillar Projects” An indispensable resource for all who seek an easy-to-use guide to the caterpillars of this vast region David L. Wagner is Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Connecticut. He is coauthor of two United States Forest Service guides, “Caterpillars of Eastern Forests” and “Geometroid Caterpillars of Northeastern” and “Appalachian Forests”.  Peterson First Guide to Butterflies and Moths Author Roger Troy Peterson  Product DescriptionPeterson First Guides are the first books the beginning naturalist needs. Condensed versions of the famous Peterson Field Guides, the First Guides focus on the animals, plants, and other natural things you are most likely to see. They make it fun to get into the field and easy to progress to the full-fledged Peterson Guides. About the AuthorRoger Tory Peterson, one of the world’s greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O’Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.Butterflies of North America Author Kenn Kaufman and Jim Brock  From Publishers WeeklyFrom its durable, flexible cover to its color-coordinated index, this field guide will serve as an excellent identification resource for experienced and novice lepidopterists. Kaufman (Kingbird Highway) provides butterfly watchers with more than 2,200 digitally edited photographs and an easy-to-use species index-a format that defines the Kaufman Focus Guides. The photographs have been gleaned from scores of skilled nature photographers. Co-author Brock (Butterflies of Southeastern Arizona) brings more than 30 years of butterfly watching around the world to the informative, non-technical writing in the book. The readable capsule narratives are enhanced by the startling clear color images, which make identification of species much easier. The guide offers images of larval (caterpillar) stage butterflies along with details on feeding preferences of butterflies in their different stages of development. It also gives migratory information on these delicate and beautiful creatures. The book ranges geographically from the lower 48 states through Canada and Alaska, with maps provided for all butterflies depicted. These maps also indicate both common and rare species, along with seasonally occurring butterflies. This book will appeal to bird watchers, hikers, gardeners and outdoor enthusiasts. From BooklistThe beautiful, day-flying butterflies are a group of insects with which everyone is familiar, and the relatively new sport of butterfly watching is gaining adherents. This new field guide has been produced to illustrate all of the species in the North American continent. Each species is listed by common name and scientific name and receives a several-sentence description, including flight time and larval food plants. All except very local or accidental species also are shown on range maps. The illustrations are opposite the written description, with most species pictured in multiple images. As in Kaufman’s Birds of North America, the illustrations are created by digital enhancement of photographs, which allows the sizes of the individual butterflies and the lighting characteristics of the photos to be evened out on an individual plate, making the illustrations directly comparable. An index of larval food plants is a nice addition, and the main index of common names also acts as a checklist for species seen. An essential purchase for all libraries. Review “Even better than his very good bird guide. This is the best butterfly guidebook I have seen.” Minneapolis Star-Tribune “A terrific book for anyone interested in butterflies.” Pittsburg Post Gazette “This book sets a new level in natural history ID field guides.” – Hank Brodkin, author of Butterflies of Arizona, and member, North American Butterfly Association Product DescriptionKaufman Focus Guides cut through the clutter to focus on the essentials. * More than 2,300 images of butterflies in natural, lifelike poses * Pictorial table of contents * Convenient one-page index * Full index that doubles as a life list * Similar species arranged side by side for easy comparison * Range maps on text pages showing where each species is common or rare and indicating seasons of occurrence About the Author Jim P. Brock, an active lepidopterist for more than thirty years, has studied butterflies throughout North America as well as in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Brazil. The coauthor of Butterflies of Southeastern Arizona (1991), he has also written many magazine articles and has led butterfly-watching tours in the United States and Mexico. Kenn Kaufman is a legend among birders. At sixteen he hitch hiked back and forth across North America, traveling eighty thousand miles in a year, simply to see as many birds as he could; he came back to tell the story in KINGBIRD HIGHWAY. A field editor for AUDUBON and a regular contributor to every major birding magazine, he is the youngest person ever to receive the Ludlow Griscom Award, the highest honor of the American Birding Association. His natural history pursuits have taken him to all seven continents, but he has made a special study of North American birds. His books include LIVES OF NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS, the PETERSON FIELD GUIDE TO ADVANCED BIRDING, and the FOCUS GUIDE TO BIRDS OF NORTH AMERICA. He resides in Tucson, Arizona. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. ENJOYING BUTTERFLIES A Note from Kenn Kaufman Most people seem to be aware of butterflies more as symbols than as real living creatures. Although there are hundreds of species of butterflies in North America, they somehow escape public notice most of the time. Out in plain sight, they lead secret lives. I still recall how surprised I was when I began to notice them myself. At the age of fourteen, having learned a lot of my local birds, I decided to see if there were any butterflies in the neighborhood. Amazingly, as soon as I began looking for them, they appeared: Little Wood-Satyrs flopping through the woods, tiny Reakirt’s Blues on weed flowers in vacant lots, and dozens more. Although I had been outside looking for birds, up to that time I had utterly missed these other winged creatures. Butterflies are not birds, of course. They are very different in their habits, yearly cycles, and population dynamics. And they’re a lot smaller. The biggest ones, like Monarchs and Giant Swallowtails, may grab our attention, but most of the diversity is among the smaller butterflies. We have far more species of little hairstreaks, blues, skippers, and the like than we do of the big guys. Small can be beautiful: even the tiniest butterflies have intricate patterns that are well worth appreciating. But until recently, it has been extremely difficult to identify many of these butterflies in the field. Even separating some larger species has been problematic, because their identification often depends on small details. Until the recent development of good close-focusing binoculars and cameras, many butterflies could be recognized only by expert lepidopterists with vast experience. I have been lucky enough to have one such lepidopterist as a good friend for years, and luckier still that he is the kind of expert who is always ready to share his knowledge. Jim Brock has studied butterflies from Alaska to Brazil, and in the field he dazzles everyone with his ability to find and identify even the rare and little-known species; but he will also patiently point out the most common butterflies to anyone who wants to know them. Jim agreed to coauthor this book as a way of helping new- comers to the field. In doing so, he graciously accepted the challenge of our Focus Guide format: boiling his vast knowledge down to just the essentials that would be most useful in a pocket-sized book. If any serious lepidopterists are displeased by the treatments here, they should blame me, not Jim Brock. But of course serious lepidopterists (who already have their technical reference works) are not the primary audience for this book. The Focus Guides are shortcuts, intended to be the best and fastest way to get started in a subject, to send you outside quickly, putting names on what you find. Slip this book into your pocket the next time you go exploring, and start discovering the secret world of butterflies for yourself. IDENTIFYING BUTTERFLIES In naming a butterfly, the first step is to make sure that it really is one. The order Lepidoptera includes the moths as well as the butterflies, and some moths are active by day and are quite colorful. Usually they sit or behave in an obviously different way from butterflies. If in doubt, look at the antennae. On butterflies, the tip of each antenna has a thickened area, or “club.” North American moths lack this feature; their antennae are either threadlike to the tip, feathery, or fringed along the edges. Butterflies have four wings: two on each side, the forewing and the hindwing. The upperside and underside of each wing usually has a different pattern. To describe a color pattern on a butterfly, therefore, we have to say where it is — for example, on the upperside of the forewing. Lepidopterists can describe butterfly patterns in great detail using a system of numbering the wing veins and the spaces between them. It’s hard to apply that system to an active butterfly in the wild, so we don’t use it in this guide, except to point out the cell, an area outlined by veins near the base of each wing. However, a few terms are necessary for communicating about the intricate patterns of some species; see the diagrams below for the simplified terminology used in this guide. What to look for: Wing patterns are obviously important in identifying butterflies, but they are not the only clues. Here are some other points to consider. Size: Some swallowtails are six inches or more from one wingtip to the other, while some blues are much less than an inch across. Since these wingspan measurements are hard for most people to visualize, we have treated sizes in this guide by showing one individual on each color plate at actual life size in gray outline. The illustrations are in correct scale relative to the others on that page, but not necessarily to those on other pages; be sure to check the “actual size” figure each time you turn the page, to get an idea whether the butterflies shown are actually big, medium-sized, or small. Little butterflies do not grow up to be big ones: once they complete the transformation to winged adult, their size does not change. However, there are variations within a species. Early spring individuals are often smaller than those of summer; females are often larger than males. And occasionally we see a “runt” individual that is oddly small. But with experience, you will find that size is usually a good quick clue to identification. Shape: At a glance, most butterflies may seem to be roughly the same shape. With closer study, you will begin to see differences in wing shapes that help to create the distinctive look of each species. Some have extended “tails” on the hindwings, or jagged or scalloped outer wing margins. Other differences are much more subtle, such as the wingtips being slightly more rounded or pointed. But with practice you will find that a butterfly’s shape is an important identifying mark. Posture: The way a butterfly sits is always worth noticing. Sulphurs almost always perch with their wings folded tightly above their backs; metalmarks usually have their wings spread out flat; cloudywings usually hold their wings half open in a shallow V; and grass skippers often hold their hindwings spread farther than their forewings. Any butterfly may sit in an odd position at times, but the typical posture can be a good clue to identification. We have tried to illustrate and describe this for all species. Flight style: Experts often can recognize a butterfly as it flits past — not because they can actually see detailed field marks on its fast-moving wings, but because the way it flies is a field mark in itself. Some species fly erratically, others more directly; some flutter along with regular steady flaps, while others flap a few times quickly and then glide. These flight styles are hard to describe in words, but with practice you will learn to recognize many of them. Fine details: Some field marks involve very small details, such as the colors of the eyes, the color or pattern on the antennae, or the color of the “face” (the palps, on the front of the head). These things really can be seen in the field, but for wary species you may need to use binoculars. Good binoculars are now available that can focus as close as just a few feet away, allowing incredible views of butterflies and other small creatures. One good source of information on binoculars for butterfly-watching can be found online at www.eagleoptics.com. Variation in butterflies: As with humans and other living things, no two individual butterflies look exactly alike. Most of the variation within a species is so minor that you won’t notice it in the field, but sometimes it’s enough to cause confusion. Occasionally you’ll see an individual that looks totally unlike the normal color pattern for its species; these aberrant butterflies may be identifiable only by shape or other clues. Many species vary from place to place, and if these variations are well marked, a local or regional population may be designated as a subspecies; see p. 14 for more information. There are also seasonal variations. For example, Zebra Swallowtails flying in spring are smaller and paler than those flying in summer, even though they all belong to the same species; Goatweed Leafwings flying in fall have more sharply pointed forewings than those flying in early summer. Males and females often differ in pattern or even in shape — sometimes subtly, sometimes so strikingly that they appear to be unrelated. And finally, every individual butterfly gradually changes in appearance as its condition becomes more worn and faded. The two Painted Ladies shown here, for example, were sitting on flowers in the same meadow. The ragged one on the right can still be identified, because Painted Ladies have lots of field marks, but some butterflies in this condition would be unrecognizable. Habitat and season: Many butterflies are restricted to particular habitats, and this is a key not only to finding them but to identifying them. We give habitat descriptions for most species in this guide, and these should always be considered. Seasons are important as well. Even in warm climates, only a few species are on the wing year-round; in most species, adults are present only in certain seasons. We usually describe these flight seasons in general terms, such as “early summer,” and these designations relate to local conditions, not arbitrary calendar dates. The Sara Orangetip, for example, is an early spring butterfly. It may appear by late January in Arizona and not until the end of May in the Yukon Territory, but those dates qualify as “early spring” in both locations. About the illustrations: Naturalists have debated for years whether field guides should be illustrated with paintings or photographs. This book uses a third method, in… Do Butterflies Bite? Author  Hazel Davies and Carol Butler   ReviewThis mixed-audience book answers many questions readers probably have never thought about these charismatic insects. Davies and Butler have produced a work about butterflies (and moths) that offers more than mere trivia. … it is a useful addition to the insect-answers literature. Recommended. Finally we have a well organized, clearly written reference with answers to almost every conceivable question that anyone might imagine concerning butterflies and moths. This volume is perfect for anyone fascinated by the seemingly endless mysteries of the natural world. — Don R. Davis, research entomologist, The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC –Don R. Davis, research entomologist, The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC This book answers everything you would like to know about butterflies – a great addition to the library for those who like butterflies and nature! — Jim P. Brock, coauthor of Butterflies of North America –Jim P. Brock, coauthor of Butterflies of North America Product Description How fast do butterflies fly? Does a butterfly have ears? Do they sleep? Does a caterpillar have a skeleton? How does a moth get out of its cocoon? What is the difference between a butterfly and a moth? And just what is a skipper? Every year, thousands of people visit butterfly conservatories to stand in quiet awe of the simple beauty displayed by these magical creatures. Hazel Davies and Carol A. Butler capture the sense of wonderment and curiosity experienced by adults and children alike in this book about butterflies and their taxonomic cousins, the moths and the skippers. Beautifully illustrated with color and black and white photographs, and drawings by renowned artist William Howe, this book is an essential resource for parents, teachers, students, or anyone who has ever been entranced by these fascinating, fluttering creatures. Covering everything from their basic biology to their complex behaviors at every stage of life to issues in butterfly conservation, Davies and Butler explore wide-ranging topics and supply a trove of intriguing facts. You’ll find tips on how to attract more butterflies to your garden, how to photograph them, and even how to raise them in your own home. Arranged in a question and answer format, the book provides detailed information written in an accessible style that brings to life the science and natural history of these insects. In addition, sidebars throughout the book detail an assortment of butterfly trivia, while extensive appendices direct you to organizations, web sites, and more than 200 indoor and outdoor public exhibits, where you can learn more or connect with other Lepidopterophiles (butterfly lovers).From the Back Cover “Finally we have a well-organized, clearly written reference with answers to almost every conceivable question that anyone might imagine concerning butterflies and moths. This volume is perfect for anyone fascinated by the seemingly endless mysteries of the natural world.”

–Don R. Davis, research entomologist, The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC “This book answers everything you would like to know about butterflies–a great addition to the library for those who like butterflies and nature!”

–Jim P. Brock, coauthor of Butterflies of North America “The true gift of butterflies is the beauty they bring to the lives of those of us who have paused to listen to their fascinating story. This book brings their beauty to you.”

–William H. Howe, butterfly artist, collector, author of The Butterflies of North America and Butterflies and MothsAbout the AuthorHazel Davies is the living exhibits coordinator at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. She formerly worked as a science teacher. Carol A. Butler is a psychotherapist in private practice, a writer, a photographer, and a docent at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Peterson First Guide to Caterpillars of North AmericaAuthor Amy Bartlett Product Description Here is the first and only guide to a subject of great interest to gardeners, small children, and lepidopterists: caterpillars, the immature form of butterflies and moths. This guide describes 120 common species of these fuzzy creatures. All the caterpillars, their adult forms and many of their host plants are illustrated. About the AuthorRoger Tory Peterson, one of the world’s greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O’Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.Butterflies and MothsAuthor Nic Bishop Product DescriptionAward-winning author and photographer Nic Bishop brings his vast knowledge of biology to this eye-catching exploration of butterflies and moths. With breathtaking full-page images, Nic introduces young readers to the beauty and diversity of these amazing insects, from the shockingly bright Blue Morpho butterfly to the nearly transparent glasswing butterfly to the mouthless Luna moth. The simple, engaging text presents both basic information and fun, quirky facts about the insects’ appearance, habits, and life cycle–including a double gatefold spread of a butterfly in flight.About the AuthorNic Bishop’s trademark close-up photographs show the beauty and otherworldliness of spiders. Simple, engaging text conveys basic information about spider body parts, life cycles, webs, and prey. A double-gatefold opens to reveal a stop-action sequence showing a jumping spider leaping! And in the back pages, Nic explains how he takes his award-winning photos. Butterflies through Binoculars: The East – A Field Guide to the Butterflies of Eastern North America  Author Jeffrey Glassberg  Review  ”The life blood of Dr. Jeffrey Glassberg’s new field guide are the superb photographs of living butterflies. Over 300 species of butterflies occurring in the eastern half of the United States and southeastern Canada are covered. The uniformly high quality of the photographs is instantly obvious….Glassberg and all those who helped him are to be commended on having produced a truly state of the art field guide.”–News of the Lepidopterists’ Society.Product DescriptionThis magnificent field guide greatly expands on Butterflies Through Binoculars: The Boston-New York-Washington Region–identified by Defenders of Wildlife Magazine as “the first to focus on netless butterflying” and called ” a clear winner” by the Audubon Naturalist. Glassberg here shows us how to find, identify, and enjoy all of the butterflies native to the eastern half of the United States and southeastern Canada. This guide: *Combines the immediacy and vividness of actual photographs of living butterflies with the traditional field guide format *Emphasizes conservation over collection *Includes 630 color photographs, arranged on 72 color plates, of butterflies in the wild *Provides adjacent color maps that show where each species occurs in a given locality and for how much of the year *Supplies entirely new field marks for butterfly identification *Demonstrates how to identify subjects by way of the key characteristics butterflies are likely to display in their natural settings *Shows how species can be recognized both from above and below *Explains how to differentiate between males and females. For butterfly enthusiasts, for bird watchers who want to add a new dimension to their hobby, for anyone who is simply interested in exploring the wilds of their own back yard, this new field guide offers hours of delightful help and instruction. About the AuthorDr. Jeffrey Glassberg is President of the North American Butterfly Association and editor of American Butterflies magazine. He lives in Morristown, New Jersey. Caterpillars in the Field and Garden: A Field Guide to the Butterfly Caterpillars of North America Author Thomas Allen, James Brock, and Jeffrey Glassberg ReviewPraise for the Through Binoculars series: “May do for butterflies what Roger Tory Peterson’s landmark handbooks did for birds in the 1930s.”–The Village Voice “The authors, all independent scholars, are among the leading lepidopterists in North America. This book fulfilled the reviewer’s expectations that it would be a masterpiece. It presents the most comprehensive treatment of North American butterfly caterpillars available, vastly surpassing all other general references…This book is destined to become a classic.” Choice Product DescriptionJeffrey Glassberg’s acclaimed Butterflies through Binoculars guides have revolutionized the way we view butterflies. Now there’s a field guide in the same practical format, and with the same emphasis on conservation, to identify caterpillars. Caterpillars are as varied, fascinating, and often as colorful as the adult butterflies they become. This is the most comprehensive guide to these creatures available. It contains all the information necessary to find and identify the caterpillars of North America–from Two-tailed Swallowtails, some of the largest butterfly caterpillars at just over two inches when fully grown, to tiny Western Pygmy-Blues. Caterpillar seekers will learn how to distinguish between butterfly caterpillars and moth caterpillars, where and how to find caterpillars, and the visual differences between young and older caterpillars. Each species section describes how to identify the caterpillar, complete with brilliant photos–many published here for the first time. To make for easy field use, each caterpillar’s key physical features, abundance, habitat, and major host plants are listed on the same page as its photo. The book also contains a special section on butterfly gardening, offering valuable information on how to set up a butterfly garden and raise healthy butterfly caterpillars, and provides a thorough list of the plants butterflies most like to feast on. From the concerned gardener who wishes not to kill caterpillars that may one day become beautiful butterflies to the serious butterflier wishing to take the hobby to the next level, this remarkable guide will provide all of the information necessary for an enriching caterpillar experience.About the AuthorThomas J. Allen is author of The Butterflies of West Virginia and Their Caterpillars. Jim P. Brock is co-author of Butterflies of North America and Butterflies of Southeastern Arizona. Jeffrey Glassberg, the general editor of the Butterflies through Binoculars series, is President of the North American Butterfly Association and editor of American Butterflies Magazine. Butterflies of the East Coast: An Observer’s GuideAuthor Rick Cech and Guy Tudor From Scientific AmericanWeighing in at more than three pounds, this book is not intended to be a field guide that you can tuck in your back pocket. But it is easy to use if not to carry, and its girth allows it to be wonderfully comprehensive: 234 species each get their own big page, complete with range maps, color photographs and information on preferred plants. Editors of Scientific American Review This book is not intended to be a field guide that you can tuck in your back pocket. But it is easy to use if not to carry, and its girth allows it to be wonderfully comprehensive. — Scientific American Over the last 15 years, butterflies have also developed a new fan base among adult bird watchers [who] . . . soon demanded butterfly field guides in color with range maps and standardized names, like the classic birding guides. . . . The most beautiful and in-depth new book is Butterflies of the East Coast: An Observers Guide by Rich Cech and Guy Tudor. — Carol Stocker, Boston Globe This volume is one of the best books on American natural history to appear in recent years. . . . [H]ere we have a single volume that will go a long way toward educating older students and adults. It needs to be read. — American Butterflies This is an outstanding resource that belongs in every naturalist’s library. — Dan R. Kunkle, Wildlife Activist A recently published book by Rick Cech and Guy Tudor called Butterflies of the East Coast is a magnificent addition to the butterfly literature. This book will increase the skill and enthusiasm of all butterfly observers. What a labor of love this book is! All of the butterflies along the Eastern seaboard, from Maine to Florida, are covered. . . . The identification sections are particularly notable to me. I think the descriptions are more useful than the descriptions in any of the other field guides on North American butterflies. Cech and Tudor’s descriptions are wonderfully clear, with an economy of words. — Herb Wilson, Maine Today We’re most fortunate this year. A number of fine natural history books have been issued just in time for summer reading. . . . Easily the most spectacular new book is Butterflies of the East Coast: An Observer’s Guide by Rick Cech and Guy Tudor. This will surely become the standard text on butterflies. — Gerry Rising, Buffalo News This is sure to become a widely used book, suitable for a broad audience of naturalists, ecologists, and butterfly observers. — Northeastern Naturalist Whether you’re a Lepidoptera enthusiast or just a nature lover, there is a super new observer’s guide on the market, Butterflies of the East Coast…. Take it from me, you can’t miss with this book. — Glenn Ayers, Burlington Times News Product DescriptionHere is an accessible, informative, and highly illustrated book that offers a fresh view of butterflies in the East Coast states, from the Atlantic seaboard to the Appalachians. In addition to providing a wealth of facts and photos, the book is the first to furnish detailed and up-to-date photo-illustrated information on the host plants favored by particular species. With 234 full-page species accounts and accompanying range maps, plus more than 950 large-size color photos, it is an essential reference work for field observers, gardeners, educators, and conservation managers–or anyone interested in appreciating the Lepidopteran world close at hand. The introductory chapters detail the subtle ecology of the East Coast region, establishing a consistent ecological framework that enriches the individual species accounts. There is also an overview of current scientific literature and observational findings to help readers better interpret complex butterfly behaviors in the field, including seasonal movements, host plant and diapause strategies, defensive chemistry, and more. The book is written by Rick Cech, a seasoned field observer who has spent years studying and photographing East Coast butterflies. His substantial first-hand experience with both the common and rare species in the region adds much depth and new insight to the commentary. 234 full-page species accounts and accompanying range maps 950 large-size color photos 215 photos of individual host plants and habitats 735 high-quality photos of butterflies and caterpillars Introductory chapters detailing the subtle ecology of the East Coast region An overview of current scientific literature and observational findings Descriptions of diapause and host plant strategies and defensive chemistry User-friendly with clear, concise text From the Inside Flap“This is the most authoritative, informative, and exciting book about the identification, ecology and behavior of butterflies available. It provides a novel and eye-opening view of butterflies, expanding the horizons of how we view them. Armed with this book, we can all attract butterflies to our gardens, parks, and natural habitats, and follow all stages of their development from the caterpillar to the adult.”–Joanna Burger, Rutgers University “Butterflies of the East Coast is an exciting book, combining a very user-friendly guide for naturalists with enough information on each species to be useful to ecologists and other scientists. Designed to reach a large part of the U.S. population and of high professional quality, it elevates butterflies to the rank of birds as accessible, indeed compelling subjects of natural history.”–Edward O. Wilson, Harvard University “Butterflies of the East Coast honors the strong tradition of Eastern Seaboard butterfly books, from Scudder to Klots to Opler and Krizek to Glassberg. By treating the entire butterfly fauna of the Atlantic edge and its associated uplands, from Mt. Katahdin to Everglades hammocks, Cech and Tudor show how arctic and tropical influences combine to make the great zoological stew of the Appalachians. Along with excellent accounts and images of all the species, this fine book presents–in graceful language at a widely readable level– the fullest discussion I know of how butterflies really live and how they respond to the countryside.”–Robert M. Pyle, author of the Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Butterflies and founder of the Xerces Society TI: Cech, Butterflies of the East Coast “Butterflies have become the major scientific model system for terrestrial invertebrates, and one of the reasons is the huge amount of work that has been done on their biology by amateurs. Butterflies of the East Coast is exactly the sort of book that will encourage amateurs not just to collect or photograph butterflies, but also to learn about their ecology and behavior. One of the book’s outstanding attributes is the care with which it ties butterflies to the plants their caterpillars eat, even providing pictures of the host plants. Every naturalist in the eastern United States will want a copy of this book–and many professional biologists will also find it very useful.”–Paul R. Ehrlich, Bing Professor of Population Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.From the Back Cover“This is the most authoritative, informative, and exciting book about the identification, ecology and behavior of butterflies available. It provides a novel and eye-opening view of butterflies, expanding the horizons of how we view them. Armed with this book, we can all attract butterflies to our gardens, parks, and natural habitats, and follow all stages of their development from the caterpillar to the adult.”–Joanna Burger, Rutgers University “Butterflies of the East Coast is an exciting book, combining a very user-friendly guide for naturalists with enough information on each species to be useful to ecologists and other scientists. Designed to reach a large part of the U.S. population and of high professional quality, it elevates butterflies to the rank of birds as accessible, indeed compelling subjects of natural history.”–Edward O. Wilson, Harvard University “Butterflies of the East Coast honors the strong tradition of Eastern Seaboard butterfly books, from Scudder to Klots to Opler and Krizek to Glassberg. By treating the entire butterfly fauna of the Atlantic edge and its associated uplands, from Mt. Katahdin to Everglades hammocks, Cech and Tudor show how arctic and tropical influences combine to make the great zoological stew of the Appalachians. Along with excellent accounts and images of all the species, this fine book presents–in graceful language at a widely readable level– the fullest discussion I know of how butterflies really live and how they respond to the countryside.”–Robert M. Pyle, author of the Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Butterflies and founder of the Xerces Society TI: Cech, Butterflies of the East Coast “Butterflies have become the major scientific model system for terrestrial invertebrates, and one of the reasons is the huge amount of work that has been done on their biology by amateurs. Butterflies of the East Coast is exactly the sort of book that will encourage amateurs not just to collect or photograph butterflies, but also to learn about their ecology and behavior. One of the book’s outstanding attributes is the care with which it ties butterflies to the plants their caterpillars eat, even providing pictures of the host plants. Every naturalist in the eastern United States will want a copy of this book–and many professional biologists will also find it very useful.”–Paul R. Ehrlich, Bing Professor of Population Studies, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University About the AuthorRick Cech is the author of “A Distributional Checklist of Butterflies of the New York City Area”. Guy Tudor is president of the New York City Butterfly Club. Handbook for Butterfly Watchers Author Robert Pyle  Review “Pyle is America’s butterfly guru. Here’s a thorough butterfly guide–the first to emphasize watching, not collecting and possessing.” Whole Earth Review Product Description This essential handbook covers where to find butterflies; how to observe and photograph them; their behavior, biology, ecology, and life histories; butterfly gardening; butterfly rearing; identification; and conservation. About the AuthorROBERT MICHAEL PYLE is the author of fourteen books, including Chasing Monarchs, Where Bigfoot Walks, and Wintergreen, which won the John Burroughs Medal. A Yale-trained ecologist and a Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in southwestern Washington.An Obsession With Butterflies: Our Long Love Affair With A Singular Insect  Author Sharman Russell  From Publishers WeeklyAs she did in Anatomy of a Rose, Russell focuses on the natural world here, now concentrating on insects that have long fascinated humans with their beauty, grace and magical ability to transform themselves from lowly caterpillars. According to the author, there are about 18,000 species of known butterflies, varying in color, mating behavior and migratory patterns. Russell merges wit, knowledge and poetic language in this engaging scientific rumination, recounting the stories of several obsessed collectors, including Eleanor Granville, who, in the early 1700s, was declared insane because of her hobby. Vladimir Nabokov is known to entomologists as the man who not only discovered several butterfly species, but reclassified North and South American blues. Russell provides many interesting anecdotes about butterfly mating practices and explains the difference between moths and butterflies. The monarch, for example, drops on the female and forces her to the ground, while a male queen butterfly more sensitively attracts his mate by the scent of the alkaloids he has ingested for this purpose. Some species, like male Apollos, are able to glue a sphragis, or shell, over the female’s abdomen that functions as a chastity belt to prevent her from remating and losing the original male’s sperm. Russell has produced a well researched and beautifully written natural history of these colorful insects.Review ”An Obsession with Butterflies is itself a singular work of art, with its smooth, ethereal prose.” — San Diego Union Tribune “A masterpiece of storytelling.” — Seattle Times “Evocative… An Obsession with Butterflies offers a short but engrossing tour of their fascinating world.” — Wall Street Journal Product DescriptionButterflies have always served as a metaphor for resurrection and transformation, but as Sharman Apt Russell points out in this lyrical meditation, butterflies are above all objects of obsession. She reveals the logic behind our endless fascination with butterflies and introduces us to the legendary collectors and dedicated scientists who have obsessively catalogued new species of Lepidoptera. A luminous journey through an exotic world of passion and strange beauty, this is a book to be treasured by anyone who has ever experienced the enchantment of butterflies. About the AuthorSharman Apt Russell is the author of several books, including Hunger and Songs of the Fluteplayer, which won the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award. She has written for publications including Discover and Nature Conservancy, and currently contributes to Onearth, the magazine for the National Resource Defense Council. Russell teaches creative writing at Western New Mexico University and at Antioch University in Los Angeles, California. She lives in Silver City, New Mexico. End of Butterfly Field Guide BooksChildren’s Butterfly Books Each one of these children’s books has the recommended reading level included in the description. There are story books and books with family and school projects.Children’s Butterfly BooksEach one of these children’s books has the recommended reading level included in the description. There are story books and books with family and school projects. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Pop-Up Book  Author Eric CayleAmazon.com ReviewAuthor Q&A with Eric Carle Q: It’s clear that creating pictures gives you great joy. Are there other hobbies or interests that give you a similar sort of happiness? A: Not in the same way, though I do enjoy gardening. I have more recently been taking photographs of interesting textures I come upon in my daily life and immediate surroundings: a patch of grass, a section of cement sidewalk. About the question of hobbies, I have often said: My work is my hobby and my hobby is my work, because even when I am not working in my studio, I may be thinking about a book or an idea that is connected to what I am working on. Q: Can you share some of your favorite memories of meeting children and adults who admire your work? A: I have met many wonderful people over the years, children and teachers, parents. People come with so many meaningful stories about my books in their classroom and kind words about their own childhood memories of being read to. It is very gratifying to meet people who enjoy your work. I have also been on the receiving end of a tremendous amount of fan mail over the years. And have been sent many gems, letters and drawings from children around the world. One of my favorite letters was from a reader who told me, I believe he was writing from Texas, that he wanted to come and visit me but he wasn’t allowed to cross the street! Q: Many characters in your books are animals – how did you develop such a love of the natural world? A: I have always loved animals and insects and been fascinated by them. My father was an animal lover and took me on walks in the woods, introducing me to the creatures who lived underneath the bark and so forth. And I think my approach to how I draw animals is a combination of realistic and imaginary. While I have photography books in my studio that I refer to and while I aim for a certain amount of accuracy when it comes to my pictures of animals, the creatures in my books are also growing out of my imagination. From Publishers Weekly In honor of the 40th anniversary of Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar comes the first-ever pop-up edition of this book. When the familiar, tiny caterpillar pops out of his egg, a dial lets readers help him chug across Carle’s earthy color palette. Next, the caterpillar eats his way through a week’s worth of pop-up fruit, as well as a full-page display of sweet and savory treats, (resulting in a stomach-ache), before his eventual transition into a butterfly. The pop-ups, particularly a half-cylinder tree trunk that sprouts from the center of the spread and a large accordionlike cocoon, are well executed and engaging. While the prominent use of white space lends a sparser feel than in the picture book, the shimmering wings of the pop-up butterfly dazzle on the final spread. Ages 3–up.Product Description Celebrating the 40th anniversary of one of the most popular children’s books ever created, this pop-up edition of The Very Hungry Caterpillar is the perfect new platform for the classic caterpillar, who literally pops off the pages of the book—crawling along branches, munching through food, and in one of the most memorable climaxes ever, emerging vibrantly as a three-dimensional beautiful butterfly. This is a stunning, tour-de-force pop-up that no fan of Mr. Carle’s work will want to miss.From the Inside Flap One sunny Sunday, the caterpillar was hatched out of a tiny egg. He was very hungry. On Monday, he ate through one apple; on Tuesday, he ate through three plums–and still he was hungry. Strikingly bold, colorful pictures and a simple text in large, clear type tell the story of a hungry little caterpillar’s progress through an amazing variety and quantity of foods. Full at last, he made a cocoon around himself and went to sleep, to wake up a few weeks later wonderfully transformed into a butterfly! Brilliantly innovative designer and artist Eric Carle has dramatized the story of one of Nature’s commonest yet loveliest marvels, the metamorphosis of the butterfly, in a picture book to delight as well as instruct the very youngest reader or listener. Cleverly die-cut pages show what the caterpillar ate on successive days, graphically introducing sets of up to 10 objects and also the names of the days of the week in rotation, as well as telling the central story of the transformation of the caterpillar. The final, double-page picture of the butterfly is a joyous explosion of color, a vibrant affirmation of the wonder and beauty of Nature. –This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition. About the Author Eric Carle divides his time between the Florida Keys and the mountains of North Carolina. Visit the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts. The Family Butterfly Book  Author Rick MulkaFrom School Library Journal – Grades 5 Up – This handsome, oversized volume, chockablock with family/classroom projects and experiments, is sure to be greeted enthusiastically. Lavish, crisp full-color photos, information boxes, maps, and lists of butterfly do’s and don’ts make clear the creatures’ physiology and metamorphosis. Mikula gives solid instructions on raising butterflies and creating butterfly habitats. He discusses the capture of wild specimens (to be released) and the taking of pupae/chrysalides for home/classroom rearing, including lots of caveats to young collectors throughout. No commercial sources are listed. The author also presents the joys of color photography, giving tips on equipment and techniques. All in all, a substantial and eye-catching title. Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY Product Description – Raise your own butterflies! – Create a butterfly habitat with 15 projects and activities – Close-ups of 40 favorite North American butterflies.  Everyone enjoys seeing butterflies flitting about on a warm summer day, but few people realize that many species are endangered. Without help, nine out of ten caterpillars won’t survive long enough to become butterflies. The “grandfather of butterfly farming,” Rick Mikula, wants to improve these odds. In The Family Butterfly Book, Rick shares his vast knowledge, contagious enthusiasm, and deep respect for these fascinating creatures. Though many of us know that caterpillars turn into butterflies, Rick explains the transformation from start to finish – egg to caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly – and reveals where each stage can be found in the wilds of our own backyards. With stunning color photographs and detailed illustrations, Rick explains how to attract, safely catch and handle, and raise and support butterflies. He also discusses how to make irresistible habitats for butterflies and emphasizes the importance of basking sites, water sources, and shelter. Did you ever want to hand-feed a butterfly? Have a live-butterfly tree? Feature butterflies in special celebrations? Rick explains all that and more. From the Back Cover Take a Butterfly Under Your Wing From a spectacular cloud of migrating Monarchs to a vivid Red Admiral lighting on your arm, butterflies take your breath away with their beauty and freshness. In this magnificent book, butterfly expert Rick Mikula shows how you can identify, care for, and raise butterflies in your own back yard so they will grace our earth for all time. Brimming with photos, insights, tips, and a dozen projects, this book is ideal for families, school, community groups, and individuals that want to have fun with butterflies. Inside you’ll learn how to: – Hold and hand-feed a butterfly – Grow host plants and nectar plants – Make butterfly nets and rearing cages – Identify common and endangered North American butterflies About the Author Rick Mikula is known as the grandfather of butterfly farming. He owns the Hole-in-Hand Butterfly Farm and serves as Habitat Consultant for numerous museums, zoos, aviaries, universities, and parks, such as Dolly Parton’s Butterfly Emporium at Dollywood and the Hershey Gardens Butterfly House. He gives hundreds of lectures and workshops every year, and his work has been featured in newspapers, in magazines, and on television and radio programs around the world. Mikula lives in Hazleton, Pennsylvania. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. Getting to Know Butterflies I Didn’t Know That! Have you ever heard that if you touch a butterfly, you’ll rub off the powder from its wings, and it will die? Or that if a butterfly gets a drop of water on it, it will drown? Ever hear that a torn or broken butterfly wing will grow back? And everyone knows that all butterflies go to Mexico for the winter, right? Well, if you believe any of that, I’ve got a few acres of swampland I’d like to sell you. Because, you see, none of these statements is true. (If you want to know what is true, you’re going to have to keep reading.) A lot of myths like these were probably started with the best intentions, so that people wouldn’t harm butterflies. Many people believe that butterflies are such delicate creatures that they would die in the simplest breeze or anything less than perfect conditions. The truth is, butterflies have evolved to survive and thrive in extreme conditions. They exist everywhere in the world except for Antarctica. They are more in danger from environmental threats caused by humans than from natural weather conditions. They are hardier than we give them credit for, and they survive despite human intervention.  It seems that every society loves butterflies, and this goes all the way back to the dawn of civilization. Some butterfly petroglyphs date to the Bronze Age. On a trip to the Dominican Republic, I was privileged to see petroglyphs on the walls of a cave called Cueva de Borbon. The unknown ancient artist had painted the butterflies so accurately that it was easy to recognize the species as a Zebra Longwing. The first entomology reports ever recorded in the New World were written off the coast of the Dominican Republic, by none other than Christopher Columbus in October, 1492. In his ship’s log, Columbus described the large clouds of yellow butterflies that surrounded his vessels as he approached the island. Flying Flowers Columbus didn’t introduce the joy of butterfly watching to the New World, of course. Native Americans apparently always had a fascination with butterflies. The Aztecs believed their god Quetzalcoatl entered the world as a chrysalis, then transformed into a butterfly. The Aztecs also believed that the “happy dead” would come back to visit in the form of a butterfly. Aztec men of high rank often carried great bouquets of flowers for visiting butterfly relatives to enjoy. Mortals themselves were forbidden to smell the flowers from anywhere but the side because the fragrance at the top was reserved for the butterflies. This belief in reincarnation is still celebrated during the traditional Mexican Day of the Dead festivities on November 1 and 2. Whether coincidentally or not, the holiday nicely corresponds to the time when migrating Monarchs arrive at their overwintering sites. In the small town of Janitzio, fishermen load their “butterfly boats” with offerings of food and flowers that are taken to the cemetery for departed relatives. Native American Traditions Farther north from Mexico, the Blackfoot tribe was sure that butterflies brought dreams, and the women would place embroidered butterflies beside their children when they wanted them to go to sleep. And the Flatheads of Montana depicted the metamorphosis of various leps in their pottery, developing their art to such a high level of accuracy and detail that it’s quite easy to identify the species being honored. The Hopi also used butterflies in prehistoric pottery and Kachina figures; Poli Taka was the butterfly man, and Poli Mana was the butterfly girl. The most prominent members of the Hopi people were the Butterfly Clan, who took great pride in their butterfly dance. The neighboring Zunis called the butterfly man Poli Sio, while the nearby Navajos called him Begochidi. Legend has it that the Great Spirit instructed his human children to whisper wishes to these colorful messengers, who would then carry the wishes to his sky lodge for granting. Modern Lore Butterfly lore continues to this day. In the Philippines, a black butterfly is a sign of bad luck. A Filipina acquaintance of mine lived, ironically, on Lepdos, the island of butterflies off the coast of Greece. One morning she was surrounded by a group of black butterflies while jogging. Remembering childhood folklore, she became frightened and ran home. As she entered her house, the telephone was ringing. It was her mother calling from the Philippines to tell her that her father had just passed away. Eerie but true. In the Caribbean nation of Aruba, many people feel that a black butterfly is a messenger of death. Most often, though, the butterfly is a sign of good luck. In the Ozarks, one of the best things that can happen to a new bride is to have a butterfly land on her – definitely a sign of fortunate days ahead. Caterpillar and Butterfly Anatomy – A butterfly goes through developmental phases that are remarkably different from one another. Although each species is unique, here are some general characteristics. Name That Lep – Early European settlers so appreciated the resident American leps (though they unfortunately showed their appreciation by collecting them by the thousands and sending them back to Europe) that they developed many of the butterfly names we know today. For example, the Lord Baltimore, now referred to as the Baltimore Checkerspot (Euphydryas phaeton), was named for 17th-century colonist George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, because the butterfly’s colors matched those on his heraldic shield. And in fact it was the Pilgrims who named the Monarch; they believed that the golden stripe encircling the top of the hanging chrysalis resembled the golden crown worn by their own monarch, King James I of England. Long-Distance Travelers – Whatever size their wings may be, many leps are capable of great flights. The Painted Lady of Europe will make seasonal flights to Africa. And Cloudless Sulphurs, which normally inhabit the Gulf Coast, can often be found as far north as New York State as a result of natural fall dispersal. In North America (unless, as happens occasionally during fall migration, they’re blown off course and find themselves on the English coast) Monarchs regularly migrate from Canada to Mexico and return the following summer. Or at least their progeny do. No individual Monarch actually completes the round-trip migration. After wintering in Mexico or California (depending on where they start out), the butterflies head north and breed along the way. It’s their offspring that return to the starting point. Researchers have no clue how butterflies navigate this astonishing journey. All this traveling seems like an awful lot of work, considering that most butterflies are adults for only two weeks, though a few do survive for a few months. The longevity champion is not a butterfly but rather a larva, the tiny Banana Yucca Moth caterpillar, which is able to wait 30 years to form a pupa, or chrysalis, and then finally emerge in its adult form. Skippers Whereas the Monarch is our most recognizable and familiar North American butterfly, the least familiar leps are the skippers, which aren’t actually true butterflies (Papilionidae) but rather belong to the family Hesperiidae. The novice may easily confuse these generally unimpressive leps with moths. Skippers aren’t very big; they’re certainly not colorful – at best one subfamily manages a tawny orange, while the other subfamily is brown, gray, or black. And, being rather squat and hairy, they’re far from what most people would consider pretty. But there are about 3,000 species worldwide, and they can fly in short bursts of 30 miles per hour, about the speed of a cruising cheetah. Their name was inspired by their flight pattern, which resembles a stone skipping across the surface of the water. While they look like hybrids of butterflies and moths, skippers can usually be identified by their antennae. But even skippers seem like slowpokes compared to their largest-winged cousins, which can achieve a burst of 45 to 50 miles per hour. Butterflies in Danger Ah, butterflies . . . colorful and gentle and floating through their day as we all wish we could. Our love affair with leps has never been more evident than it is today, given the specialized gardens being grown, magazines being published, and clubs being organized just to help these little critters. It seems that life couldn’t be any sweeter for them, right? Unfortunately, that is just not so. Urban Sprawl vs. Caterpillar Crawl Butterfly species are disappearing faster than ever before. The more wildflower meadows that are dug up and replanted with shopping malls, the fewer butterflies we will see. Urban sprawl will eventually eliminate caterpillar crawl. Yes, butterflies are adaptable, but they can’t possibly compete with us. We can now travel to any place in the world we want to in record time, but the roads and airport runways that take us there have covered over butterfly habitats. Some wonderful meadow that seems like the perfect place to construct a home was probably a nursery to thousands of little leps every summer for hundreds of years. And now there’s a new threat: food crops that are genetically engineered to produce their own insecticides. Unfortunately, insecticides kill insects (that’s their job, and they do it well) and butterflies are, after all, insects. Creating a Butterfly Habitat “Progress” is inevitable, of course. Homo sapiens are a significant species on our planet, but humankind’s actions are causing our fellow inhabitants to suffer and in many cases perish, often to the point of extinction. We have “technology” on our side. We are winning the battle to expand our living areas at the expense of theirs. That is why butterflies desperately need our help. They need us to use our technology to help.My, Oh My–A Butterfly!  Author Tish Rube Product Description With a little help from the Cat in the Hat, Sally and Dick observe a small miracle in their own backyard—the metamorphosis of an egg into a caterpillar into a chrysalis into a bright new butterfly! Along the way, beginning readers will find out how butterflies see thousands of images at once, drink nectar from flowers, avoid predators, and can be identified by size, shape, and color. Readers will also follow the amazing migration of millions of monarchs.About the Author Tish Rabe is the author of six previous Cat in the Hat Learning Library titles. She lives in Greenwich, Connecticut. Where Butterflies Grow   Author Joanne RyderFrom School Library Journal – PreSchool-Grade 2 – For young children, there’s no better way to introduce the world of science than through one of nature’s miracles, and it is difficult to find a better example than in this wondrous story of birth and transformation. “Imagine you are someone small. . .” So begins the readers’ journey as a tiny caterpillar embarking on one of life’s odysseys. The story goes through the stages of growth as the egg evolves from birth to the glorious moment when the butterfly takes wing. Through the personalized adventure and Ryder’s strong sensory imagery, readers become the tiny creature, growing and changing. As a wonderful postscript, Ryder gives directions for adapting a part of a garden to attract butterflies. The book is packed with good information presented in an imaginative way. Cherry’s illustrations span the full page, using boxes in sequence to magnify details or follow action. Another special feature of her lush watercolors is the many small creatures hidden among the plant life, inviting readers to sharpen their powers of observation. As it opens children’s eyes to one of the wonders of nature, this book is sure to delight as well as teach. –Virginia E. Jeschelnig, Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library, Willowick, OH Product Description In a field of lacy leaves, a small caterpillar hatches, grows, and sheds its skin, becoming a smooth, green creeper. It eats and changes some more, then in a sequence of remarkable close-ups, spins a silken sling in which to pupate–until it finally bursts forth as a brilliant black swallowtail butterfly. Includes suggestions on how children can grow butterflies in their own gardens. Color throughout. *************Full color.Monarch Butterfly  Author Gibson From School Library Journal – Grade 2-4– Young naturalists will be captivated by this succinctly written, well-organized, brightly illustrated introduction to monarch butterflies. Focusing on a single monarch, the text describes each stage of its metamorphosis, basic physical and behavioral characteristics, diet, and migratory instincts. It then discusses the migration patterns of the species in general, mentions the celebrations held in their honor along the migration route, and ends with simple instructions for raising a butterfly in a jar. (The text instructs readers to pound holes in a jar lid with a hammer and a nail–no safety warning or suggestion to obtain adult help is given.) The last page consists of additional miscellaneous facts. Clear, stylized color drawings accompany the short blocks of text on every page; each is doubly framed by white and yellow backgrounds. There are a number of titles available on the life cycles of butterflies; however, most are on a slightly higher reading level and describe different species. Gibbons’ book will be a useful addition to the natural history sections of most school and public libraries. –Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library Product Description Describes the life cycle, body parts, and behavior of the monarch butterfly. Includes instructions on how to raise a monarch. About the Author Gail Gibbons has published close to fifty distinguished nonfiction titles with Holiday House. According to “The Washington Post”, “Gail Gibbons has taught more preschoolers and early readers about the world than any other children’s writer-illustrator.” She lives in Vermont. Her website is www.gailgibbons.com It’s a Butterfly’s Life  Author Irene Kelly From School Library Journal – PreSchool-Grade 4—This entertaining book allows children to comprehend the complexity of the natural world, and it will encourage their appreciation of butterflies. It is filled with details about behaviors and body parts, e.g., wings have “shimmering scales that overlap like shingles on a roof.” Kelly playfully delineates how they eat: “You may not be able to taste a cupcake by standing on it, but a butterfly can!” She characterizes the migration of monarchs and explains the process of metamorphosis by including a dramatic comparison—a monarch caterpillar is 2700 times its original weight in two weeks. “If a newborn baby gained weight that fast, it would weigh eight tons. That’s as big as two full-grown rhinos!” The text curves up and down, suggesting the fluttering movement of butterflies. Specific creatures are identified, although the delicate watercolor, gouache, and pen-and-ink artwork is somewhat muted and the colors are not quite as vibrant as one might expect. Nonetheless, this is a delightful book to share with children and would be a splendid resource for reports, even though there is no index.—Kirsten Cutler, Sonoma County Library, CA From Booklist With a simple, informative text and detailed illustrations, this picture book introduces young children to exciting scientific detail about butterflies. Each picture shows a particular species, which Kelly carefully names even as she describes common behaviors. The Baltimore Checkerspot searches for the right plant on which to lay its eggs; migrating monarchs fly up to 80 miles in just one day. Several pages depict the metamorphosis from egg to caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly. The entomology in simple words and delicately modeled ink, watercolor, and gouache artwork will make kids look closely at the natural world around them; some kids may even want to take up the suggestion to plant a butterfly garden. Hazel Rochman Product Description What is a butterfly’s life? It’s full of twists and turns as butterfly glide on aircurrents. It s full of dips and dives as they show off for their mates. There are more than 17,000 kinds of butterflies in the world. Some of them will only live for a few days. Others will migrate thousands of miles to winter in a warmer climate. Still others will hibernate through the cold months. For all butterflies, life begins with metamorphosis. In one of nature s most amazing feats, caterpillars become creatures of beauty and grace. Filled with winsome illustrations and a delightful design that looks like an artist s sketchbook, this is an inspiring companion to “It s a Hummingbird s Life”. About the Author Passionate about animals and the outdoors, Irene Kelly s “It s a Hummingbird s Life” was recognized as a Nick Jr. magazine s Best Book for Kids, was an Animal Behavior Society Outstanding Children s Book Award finalist, a CCBC Choice, and a Bank Street College Children s Book of the Year; and appeared on the John Burroughs List of Nature Books for Young Reader. The Life Cycle of a Butterfly   Author Bobbie Kalman From School Library Journal – Grade 2-4-These books open with a description of the animal or insect, followed by a discussion of the meaning of the term “life cycle.” Then, life stages are highlighted and clearly explained scientifically. How humans are adversely affecting the creatures’ lives and what students can do about it are also discussed. An abundance of clear, colorful, attractively bordered photographs and illustrations enhance the fact-filled texts. These well-written titles will be used for research and pleasure reading. Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TX Product Description This title is suitable for ages 6 to 12 years. It contains a book and audio CD. A monarch born in the fall has two major challenges! In addition to metamorphosis, these butterflies fly 4,000 miles on a two-way migration trek! This book explains butterfly metamorphosis and migration in simple terms. The text is beautifully illustrated with photographs and art, making this book a joy to read. The topics include: where butterflies lay their eggs; the ‘eating machine’ caterpillar; the transformation from pupa to chrysalis to butterfly; monarch migration; butterfly facts and activity suggestions; and, how to protect butterflies. The CD is a narration of the printed book with entertaining sound effects to guide the reader. Approximate running time: 30 minutes. Butterfly  Author Victoria Husbey From School Library Journal – Preschool-Grade 1–A variety of life cycles is simplistically described. Each book begins with either pregnancy, the laying of eggs, or the sprouting of seeds, and closes with a mature animal or plant ready to begin the cycle again. Only Frog mentions mating directly as a male and female frog come together to make baby frogs. Butterfly and Frog describe metamorphosis without using the terminology. A crisp, colorful full-page photograph faces each page of text. Across the bottom of each spread a color-coded band builds, including a graphic for each of the preceding life stages. A closing page includes six to eight facts that add interest or more detail. This basic information is well organized and presented in an attractive format. Product Description A series that gives an introduction to the lifecycles of plants and animals –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Caterpillar to Butterfly  Author Deborah Hielgman From School Library Journal – PreSchool-Grade 1 – Although the drama of metamorphosis has been documented with greater detail in other titles, this presentation stands out because of its classroom setting. The process is seen through the children’s eyes as they experience the excitement of observing the wiggly caterpillar, watch it molt, change into a chrysalis, endure the endless waiting, and stare in wonder as a Painted Lady butterfly emerges and dries its wings. The closing pages show the class at the window watching the insect pause on a flower before flying away to begin the life cycle once again. Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations create a cheerful setting similar in style to those found in Miriam Cohen’s books about classroom events. Close-ups show the stages of transformation as captions wend along plant leaves and stems reminiscent of a caterpillar crawling. A small collection of butterflies commonly found in most parts of the U.S. and a list of addresses of butterfly centers are appended. An inviting book that young children can relate to and one that teachers will find valuable to support nature-study projects. Diane Nunn, Richard E. Byrd Elementary School, Glen Rock, NJ Product Description A caterpillar comes to school in a jar. The class watches the caterpillar each day as it grows and changes. Soon, it disappears into a hard shell called a chrysalis. Then the chrysalis breaks, and a beautiful butterfly flies out of the jar! This is a perfect beginner’s guide to the mystery of metamorphosis. Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children 1997 (NSTA/CBC) About the Author Deborah Heiligman worked as a writer and editor at Scholastic Magazine before becoming a full-time writer. She is also the author of On the Move, illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell. Ms. Heiligman lives in Doylestown, PA. Butterfly Conservation Books Several of the books in this section have to do with the Monarch Butterfly. Did you know they even tag Monarchs to track their migration route? Other books write about habitat destruction and predation (from animals, insects and humans) which are taking a toll on these beautiful creatures.  The Monarch Butterfly: Biology and ConservationAuthor Michelle Solensky And Karen OberhauserProduction Description Contributors: Sonia M. Altizer, Emory University Xiomara Mora Alvarez, Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve David Bennett, University of Iowa Jane Borland, Lamar High School, Arlington, TX Walter Bremer, ASLA, Cal Poly State University Lincoln P. Brower, Sweet Briar College William H. Calvert, Independent Monarch Biologist Thomas William Crumpton III, Baylor University Andy Davis, Emory University Johannes Feddema, University of Kansas Concha Fernandez del Ray, Breck School, Minneapolis, MN Dan Feuerstein, California Polytechnic State University Miguel Franco, University of Plymouth Dennis Frey, California Polytechnic State University Eligio García-Serrano, Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve Mark S. Garland, New Jersey Audubon Society, Cape May Bird Observatory, Northwood Center Kari A. Geurts, University of Minnesota Liz Goehring, Pennsylvania State University Tammi Hoevenaar, Western Michigan University Elizabeth Howard, Journey North Laura C. H. Jesse, Iowa State University Carol C. Johnson, John Jay High School, San Antonio, TX Andrés F. Keiman, Instituto de Ecología, UNAM Dave Kust, Breck School, Minneapolis, MN Katherine Kust, Woodland Elementary School, Brooklyn Park, MN Kingston L. H. Leong, California Polytechnic State University Stephen B. Malcolm, Western Michigan University Jacob Miller, Breck School, Minneapolis, MN Monica Missrie, University of Minnesota Karen S. Oberhauser, University of Minnesota John J. Obrycki, Iowa State University Karen Pape, Breck School, Minneapolis, MN Sandra Perez, University of Texas at El Paso Michelle D. Prysby, Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont, Great Smoky Mountains National Park Linda S. Rayor, Cornell University Eduardo Rendon-Salinas, Instituto de Ecología, UNAM Jaime Lobato Reyes, Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve Wayne A. Rochester, The University of Queensland Walter H. Sakai, Santa Monica College Andrew Schaffner, California Polytechnic State University Jason Shields Michelle J. Solensky, University of Minnesota O.R. “Chip” Taylor, University of Kansas Markisha Thomas, John Jay High School, San Antonio, TX Gwen Yoshimura Myron P. Zalucki, The University of Queensland The knowledge of citizen scientists, biologists, and naturalists informs this book’s coverage of every aspect of the monarch butterfly’s life cycle (breeding, migration, and overwintering) from the perspective of every established monarch population (western North American, eastern North American, and Australian). In addition to presenting the most recent basic research on this species, The Monarch Butterfly contains the first publication of data compiled from two established citizen science projects, Journey North and the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project. It also reports for the first time on two major events of long-term importance to monarch conservation and biology: the creation of a larger protected area in the Mexican overwintering sites and a weather-related mortality event during the winter of 2002. Monarch butterflies are arguably the most recognized, studied, and loved of all insects, and the attention that scientists and the general public have paid to this species has increased both our understanding of the natural world and our concern about preserving it. The unique combination of basic research, background information, and conservation applications makes this book a valuable resource for ecologists, entomologists, naturalists, and teachers. From the Back Cover “The Monarch Butterfly: Biology and Conservation is the most up-to-date and therefore essential word on our most beloved butterfly, the grand and endangered phenomenon of the migratory Monarch. Everyone who cares a whit for Monarchs should read these crucial, comprehensive, and fascinating messages from an amazing animal and the scientists who seek to save it.”–Robert Michael Pyle, Ph.D., author of Chasing Monarchs: Migrating with the Butterflies of Passage, and founder of The Xerces Society “The world’s best known and perhaps best studied butterfly species still holds some fascinating secrets. This delicate international treasure critically needs protection and the continued vigilance of professional researchers and members of the public. This book describes pressing issues regarding the ecology and conservation of the Monarch butterfly; it is valuable for aesthetic, social, political, and scientific reasons.”–J. Mark Scriber, Professor of Entomology, Michigan State University, and author/editor of Swallowtail Butterflies: Their Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “This book succeeds not only in updating the current state of our knowledge about Monarchs and their fantastic migration, but also in showing how studies of Monarchs contribute to larger issues in contemporary biology, and how citizen scientists can be engaged in the process of scientific discovery. The commitment and hard work of these citizen scientists and the scientists who coach them makes clear the Monarch is the People’s butterfly!”–Ron Rutowski, butterfly behavioral ecologist, Arizona State University “This accessible and highly current summary of monarch butterfly reproduction, migration, over-wintering, and conservation biology should be of interest to scientists, naturalists, and anyone who is simply curious about this elegant insect. The short research papers comprising the book provide a rich mix of information, ranging from basic biology to topical conservation and management issues.”–Carol L. Boggs, Stanford University, editor of Butterflies: Ecology and Evolution Taking Flight.  About the Author Karen Oberhauser is an Assistant Professor and Michelle J. Solensky a Research Associate in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife, and Conservation at the University of Minnesota, where they study monarch biology. They also use monarchs to involve the broader community in science research through the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project and Monarchs in the Classroom.The Last Monarch Butterfly: Conserving the Monarch Butterfly in a Brave New World Author Phil Schappert From BooklistAsk people to name a species of butterfly and they will most likely mention the monarch. Found across most of the U.S., Central America, and northern South America, the monarch is a big, showy butterfly that is famous for the fact that it migrates. Spending the five coldest months of the year in a few winter roosts in Mexico (with the smaller, western population wintering in California), the butterflies move north with the spring after the emergence of their only food plants, the milkweeds. Schappert, a butterfly researcher and author (A World for Butterflies, 2000), follows the monarchs from their winter roosts as they fly north, mating along the way and laying eggs as they find appropriate plants. Two or three generations later, the late-summer butterflies begin the journey south, traveling distances as great as 4,350 miles. Monarchs face threats at every stage of their lives, a major one being the logging of the forests in the Mexican highlands, where the vast winter roosts are found. Nancy Bent Review Chosen as one of the ‘Best Books for Junior High and Young Adult 2005′ by Science Books and Films. (Science Books and Films ) A primary source for reports; beautifully illustrated. (Nancy Bent Booklist ) Takes you inside the butterfly’s world…makes a compelling case to preserve to preserve this amazing migration for future generations. (Christian Berg Allentown Morning Call ) An amazing insect; if the reader has any doubts about that, this book will put them to rest. (J. Richard Gorham Science Books and Films ) This well written volume gives excellent basic information on life cycle, predators, environmental hazards, and migration. (Paula J. Wolfe E-Streams ) Product Description The definitive guide to the world’s most recognized butterfly. Monarch butterflies are widely distributed around the world. The two most distinct populations are located in North America — one to the east and the other to the west of the Rocky Mountains. Their wide distribution, coupled with their vivid orange, white and black coloring makes the monarch the most recognizable butterfly. Regrettably, in recent years, ecological changes — specifically the loss of its feeding grounds — are threatening the monarch’s existence. The Last Monarch Butterfly provides a thorough and essential overview of these delightful creatures and helps readers to understand their plight. The book documents the monarch’s life cycle to provide a clear understanding of its natural condition including its migratory nature. Easy-to-understand text is illustrated with thirty bright, colorful photographs. The western butterfly winters in California and the eastern butterfly winters in Mexico. Natural disasters such as a recent cold snap in Mexico imperil the already depleted monarch populations. Areas in California that once hosted the monarch are now being used for residential and industrial development. Even the vast fields of flowering weeds that supported the monarch in the northern states are depleted for new development. The Last Monarch Butterfly is the definitive environmental reference on this endangered species. (200505) About the Author Phil Schappert, PhD, is the editor of the News of Lepidopterists’ Society and has written many magazine articles and scientific papers about butterflies and their host plants. He is the author of A World for Butterflies. He is a professor at the University of Texas at Austin. Preface The Monarch is an unusual butterfly by almost any measure. Imagine, if you can, an entire generation of butterflies that undertake a journey en masse covering up to 4,500 km (2,800 mi) or more — to a place they’ve never been — in a last-ditch effort to avoid the travails of winter. Imagine also a generation that, on the whole, lives five to seven times longer than the generation that preceded it and waits all of that time to fulfill its one and only purpose — to reproduce — only to barely begin the journey back to where they came from before the vast majority of them die. Consider that compared to even its closest relatives, never mind butterflies in general, the Monarch has a very unusual sex life: it eagerly partakes of the chemical precursors of needed sex pheromones but rarely, if ever, uses them, preferring instead to aggressively coerce its mates rather than lure them with perfumes, overtures and courtship rituals. Imagine a single butterfly that accomplishes all of this and survives, storing potentially noxious chemicals it acquires from its milkweed host plants for its own protection, only to succumb to the predators that await it at its only safe haven. A most unusual butterfly, indeed… In this book, I will take you on a virtual journey through the seasons and across North America from central Mexico to Canada and then back again. We begin in the overwintering grounds of the Monarch, in a living cathedral of trees where millions upon millions of butterflies wait for spring, and then travel north by northeast with the breakup of the colonies as the butterflies move to begin recolonizing their former range. We’ll follow them as they seek out their obligate caterpillar host plants, the milkweeds, then spend some time in their breeding range with the generations that follow, shifting north and then south again with the seasons and the availability of host plants, learning how the Monarch copes with the trials and tribulations of everyday life as well as the pressures we exert on their lives. Finally, we’ll follow the last generation of these butterflies as they delay their natural reproductive cycle, and journey with them, south by southwest, as they make their way back to their overwintering range. While a plethora of books, articles and papers have been written about Monarch butterfly migration and the need to protect this endangered phenomenon, most — if not all — of them have focused on the overwintering roost sites in Mexico and California and virtually ignore what might be going on in the breeding range. Throughout my education (as an undergraduate at Trent University in Peterborough, conducting doctoral work at York University in Toronto and continuing well into my post-doctoral work and research here at the University of Texas), I have been consistently challenged to see all sides of a problem. I continually ask myself: is the glass half empty or half full? There are always two sides to every story and the conservation of the Monarch is no exception. My purpose with this book is to tackle and grapple with the other side of the Monarch story. As we will learn, the entire eastern North American Monarch population does take refuge in only a few small areas of central Mexico. This, I think, gives entirely new meaning to the old adage about the danger of having all of one’s eggs in a single basket. What worries me most, however, is that Monarchs are not secure — not by any stretch of the imagination — in their breeding range either. They are threatened in a surprising number of ways, and I will argue that those threats have a dramatic impact on just how many “eggs” are in those over-wintering “baskets.” Yes, the survival of Monarch butterflies at the winter roosts impacts the potential size of the breeding population in any given year, but the reproductive success or failure of the subsequent generations of non-migrants also has dramatic effects on the number of butterflies that make it to the winter roosts. My central thesis is that you can’t save one without the other. Given that forewarned is forearmed, I hope that this book will open your eyes to these threats and thereby offer us a means of countering them. Lincoln Brower, acknowledged to be one of the leading Monarch researchers in the world, believes that the North American Monarch actually has a very poor chance of surviving through the next 20 years. The thought of losing this familiar but wondrous creature is sobering, to say the least. The Monarch is an amazing and unusual creature, and its phenomenal migration — amongst other things — make it absolutely unique, and, in my view, completely deserving of its royalty. While it appears to be secure and unthreatened — after all, since Monarchs can now be found in a number of places all over the world it is doubtful that they will ever truly go extinct — the Monarch is actually in far more danger here in North America than we might think. Swallowtail Butterflies: An Action Plan for their Conservation Author T R New and N Mark Collins Production Description This is the first insect Action Plan prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, and was chosen because swallowtail butterflies are perhaps the most charismatic to non-entomologists. Some are the largest butterflies which exist, and the “birdwings” in particular have long excited wonder and comment among naturalists of all persuasions. Out of a total of 573 species, 170 are considered to need conservation action. This Action Plan exemplifies the wide-ranging conservation needs of swallowtails by selecting a geographically broad suite of faunas and individual taxa for priority conservation action. Endangering processes are accelerating alarmingly in most of the regions listed for attention. The plan covers 34 regions throughout the world, considering within each region the conservation status of particular species, action needed, and how projects could be undertaken, together with an indication of costs involved.Threat to the Monarch Butterfly Author Rebecca Thatcher MuricaProduction Description The migration of the monarch butterflies from the United States to the mountains of Central Mexico is one of nature s most fascinating events. Every fall, millions and millions of monarch butterflies fly all the way to the mountain forests of Central Mexico, where they spend the winter clinging to the trees in large groups. In the spring, they make the long trip back to the United States and Canada, to begin the cycle again. Nature lovers, schoolchildren, and scientists are fascinated by the monarch life cycle. They tag the butterflies in gardens and schoolyards, and follow the tender insects’ flight as they travel to what is for many an unknown country. But the monarch butterflies amazing journey also puts them at risk. Their habitats the milkweed plant of North America and the Oyamel forests of Central Mexico are under constant attack. If their habitats should vanish, so too will this delicate creature. About the Author Rebecca Thatcher Murcia graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and worked as a newspaper reporter for fifteen years. She lives with her two sons in Akron, Pennsylvania. Among her other books for Mitchell Lane Publishers are The Civil Rights Movement, E.B. White, and Carl Sandburg.Ecology and Conservation of Butterflies Author A S Pulin  Review …a blockbuster of a book, packed with information and more than 650 references…Make sure you have access to this book if you are involved in any conservation work. – BBC Wildlife; Anyone concerned with nature conservation (regardless of which group they are fond) should study this book. European Journal of Entomology; Scientists, nature conservationists and amateur entomologists, as well as environmentalists, will find this book of considerable value in gaining access to up-to-date information to conservation endeavours…a well thought out compilation. – Int J of Environmental Statics; …an excellent book, one which should be compulsory reading for all those interested in conservation in general and in the conservation of butterflies in particular. – Biodiversity and Conservation Product Description This book reviews many of the latest advances in the ecology and conservation of butterflies. It brings together under one cover details of progress in the field of monitoring distribution and abundance, effects of land use, and the management of endangered species. Each chapter is written by recognized experts in their field. The book is unique in containing reviews of conservation efforts from different regions of Europe and other continents. This provides an up-to-date record and comparison of the challenges and progress made in different countries.Butterflies (Nature Watch) Author Sara Nelson   Reading this lovely book on butterflies has me seeing them everytime I leave the house. My awareness is broadened and my appreciation expanded. I learned things about butterflies I never knew before. The text is crisp, clear and appealing and the photos are great. As a granny, it’s become a project for me to share with the kids: a butterfly excursion and a chrysalis hunt. Teachers and librarians will want copies for their students.The Dangerous World of Butterflies: The Startling Subculture of Criminals, Collectors, and ConservationistsAuthor Peter LauferFrom Publishers Weekly Turning from the Iraq War, author and journalist Laufer (Mission Rejected: U.S. Soldiers Who Say No to Iraq) decided to focus on the presumably innocuous business of butterflies. There, he found yet more violence, corruption and unanswered questions, resulting in another compelling all-angles examination. Fluttering across the globe for at least 40 million years, Lepidoptera face increasing threats in modern times, largely from habitat loss and pesticides. Amateur and professional butterfly experts weigh in on everything from art to conservation, breeding and butterfly sex to development and wing colors, as well as the meaning of their fascination for humans. Lepidopterology contains a surprising stack of unsolved mysteries, including the process of metamorphosis: what goes on in the chrysalis, in which every cell of the caterpillar’s body liquefies before reconstituting into a butterfly, might as well be magic. Laufer also finds controversy in commercial breeding and discovers “worldwide criminal operations” in butterfly poaching and smuggling (in which driving species to near extinction is a standard practice for pushing up specimen prices). In casual prose, Laufer delivers an absorbing science lesson for fans of the colorful bugs.  Review “In this absorbing and far-reaching chronicle, Laufer applies his insatiable journalistic appetite to exploring the crossroads where humans and butterflies meet.” –NPR Science Desk “[A] compelling, all-angles examination. . . . Laufer delivers an absorbing science lesson for fans of the colorful bugs.” –Publishers Weekly “Recommended for scientists and lay readers who enjoyed Susan Orlean’s The Orchid Thief.” —Library Journal “Like The Orchid Thief, The Dangerous World of Butterflies takes us deep into the dark heart of obsessed collectors and the passionate activism of people working to repopulate species like the Palos Verdes blue. Worlds within worlds: Laufer, a veteran reporter on cultural and political borders, understands how these worlds cross and collide. His book is a Venn diagram of the beautiful and bizarre.” –Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times “[Laufer’s] book is charming and his attention to detail, combined with a real gift for describing these fascinating characters — like calling entomologist Arthur Shapiro “an endless litany of intriguing butterfly stories” — made me want to read everything else he has written.” –Andrew Ervin, Washington Post “…Laufer’s The Dangerous World of Butterflies packs real entertainment wallop in a book filled with informed tidbits custom-designed for cocktail hour.” –P. Joseph Potocki, The Bohemian “A charming . . . meditation on butterflies and the people who love them.” –Kirkus “The Dangerous World of Butterflies: the Startling Subculture of Criminals, Collectors, and Conservationists by Peter Laufer is an eye-opening peek into the world of butterfly collecting. From true crime to heated debates between butterfly conservationists and butterfly farmers, this book reads like a novel.” –Pittsburgh Post-Gazette “Like The Orchid Thief, a book that exposed many unexpected aspects connected to another of nature’s beautiful gifts, The Dangerous World of Butterflies is an entertaining, enlightening read.” –Seattle Times “Laufer weaves his tale with a genial flair. . . . The journey with Laufer is one well worth taking.” –Audubon “From the natural history and ecology of the butterfly to the very real threat of butterfly extinction, the world of museum collections, and more, this social, political and natural history is a key acquisition for both general lending libraries and those interested in science issues.” –Midwest Book Review Product Description A true tale of beauty and obsession, smugglers and scientists, and nature’s most enigmatic creature.From the Inside Flap War weary after writing a book about Iraq and psychologically fatigued by a career of reporting bad and sad news, Peter Laufer jokingly said his next book would be about butterflies and flowers, simple analogies for peace and love. The result: an invitation to a butterfly preserve in Nicaragua where he soon discovered the behind-the-scenes world of collectors, criminals, and cops obsessed with one of nature’s most compelling miracles. The Dangerous World of Butterflies chronicles Laufer’s adventures within the butterfly industry and the butterfly underground. He examines the allure of butterflies and recounts the constant role they have played throughout history and across cultures in mythology and art. But his research takes an unpredictable turn into the high-stake realms of organized crime, ecological devastation, species depletion, the integrity of museum collections, and chaos theory. Along with beauty and renewal, the butterfly has become an unwitting symbol for greed and vanity. Laufer’s ever-expanding journey of discovery throughout the Americas and beyond offers a rare look into a theater of intrigue, peopled with quirky and nefarious characters—all in pursuit of these delicate, beautiful creatures. Read this book, and your garden—and the world—will never quite look the same. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Peter Laufer PhD is the author of more than a dozen books, including Forbidden Creatures (Lyons Press, forthcoming) and Wetback Nation: The Case for Opening the Mexican-American Border. He is the James Wallace Chair in Journalism at the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication. More about his work, which has received the George Polk, Edward R. Murrow, and other awards, at peterlaufer.com. From The Washington Post From The Washington Post’s Book World/washingtonpost.com Reviewed by Andrew Ervin “To me,” Peter Laufer writes early in “The Dangerous World of Butterflies,” “journalism is an all-or-nothing calling. A real journalist is a journalist to the grave.” But even the toughest reporters can get worn out. Laufer, the author of many hard-edged books — about the rise of neo-Nazism, vigilantes on the Mexican-American border and, more recently, the suffering of soldiers returning from Iraq — has decided to take on a more lighthearted subject: butterflies. He begins his sally in Nicaragua, where he learns of a conflict between the “butterfly huggers” of the North American Butterfly Association and the International Butterfly Breeders Association over the staged release of butterflies at public events. His investigation reveals a sordid underworld of butterfly hobbyists in which “nefarious collectors fuel criminal butterfly poachers worldwide.” Laufer writes with humor, as if to concede that he’s trying too hard to find an exciting story where one doesn’t exist. Nevertheless, his book is charming and his attention to detail, combined with a real gift for describing these fascinating characters — he calls entomologist Arthur Shapiro “an endless litany of intriguing butterfly stories” — made me want to read everything else he has written. And I’m certain to look differently at the butterflies in my own backyard, knowing now how far they may have traveled to get there. Butterfly Drawing Books In this section we have books on actually drawing butterflies as well as crafting butterflies in embroidery and glass. There are books of butterfly drawing by specific artists and one describing how an artist uses butterflies and insects as the subjects for his photography. Birds, Butterflies, and other winged Wonders Author Pamela GilbertHardcover This book is one in a series on lesser known artists and naturalists whose work has not been published or received any attention. In July 1773, John Abbot left England and spent the next sixty seven years collecting and painting natural history specimens for clients in England, Europe and the United States. He lived primarily in Georgia and Virginia and spent all his life working to supply other naturalists and collectors with specimens and paintings of drawings of birds, insects and plants. This book is a fascinating account of John Abbot, his life and his work. It is also a visual treat and if you are interested in the history of natural history or as a naturalist or an art lover I would highly recommended it. The publisher, Merrell Holberton is publishing a series on other Natural history artists that have not been published or are lesser known. Enjoy!! This relaxed account of one of the most obscure, but possibly most important of the early naturalists is quite a treat for those interested in the field of natural history, those who enjoy a good historical read, or even those who just like to look at the pictures! John Abbot, like the region in which he worked, was an odd little man who possessed many of the qualities we long for in this country but, some would say, have lost. His tenacity, integrity, adventurousness, artistic ability, and business acumen should have gained him the fame of his more documented colleagues–but then maybe the jewel that is hardest to find shines brightest. Certainly, this book is a gem. The illustrations are first rate, and the text is even better, with just that touch of British whimsy and the art of understatement to make it all the much better. It is written in an almost off-hand style–but don’t be fooled. The research that went into it is first rate and very complete. Relax. This is not the dry, musty tome of History 101–it is full of life but has a casual feel, like a favorite coat that is constantly worn. And that befits the man about whom it is written: a common man, of uncommon traits. Enjoy!! From Library Journal – Traveling and sketching can be a combination of pleasure and potential profit, as well as an opportunity for an artist to seek new sources of inspiration. This is a guide to the tools and techniques of travel sketching, illustrated with examples from the author’s portfolio. Topics include a description of the basic tools, how to cope with common problems, adding texture to sketches, and the relative advantages of working from photographs versus sketching on the spot (and coping with unwanted spectators). Finally, the author presents helpful suggestions for critiquing the finished work. Overall, the book will be more useful to sketchers with some skill seeking to refine their techniques, rather than the beginner. However, this would be a useful addition to any drawing collection. – Stephen Rees, Bucks Cty. Free Lib., Levittown, Pa. Pheromone The Insect Artwork of Christopher Marley Author Christopher Marley  Product DescriptionChristopher Marley’s graceful arrangements of jewel-like arthropods make converts of those who have seen insects as creepy–these are stunning works of art, his delicate butterfly assemblages sublime. Marley’s keen eye for design combines with his entomological education to produce mesmerizing, kaleidoscopic bug mandalas and striking up-close-and-personal single-insect portraits. The iridescent colors of beetle shells and moth wings are his pigments in a seemingly endless brilliant palette. The photographs of these arrangements present the bugs in their natural state: he does not digitally enhance any of the images. Each gorgeous creation is identified with its scientific and common names, and many are accompanied by concise descriptive text. In succinct essays, Marley writes about insect collecting and its benefits to the environment; he describes his creative process in choosing and arranging the creatures for optimal visual effect. After a childhood spent running from every creature that skittered about on more than four legs, Marley has devoted much of his adult life to studying bugs–with increasing fascination. He makes frequent forays to remote locations far removed from his home in Oregon, seeking out the most beautiful and exotic species on Earth. The more than 170 color photographs in Pheromone will appeal to anyone intrigued by dazzling design, beautiful bugs, entomology, or all three. Accompanying the broad sample of Marley’s work is a series of essays by the artist: “Design of Insects,” “Insects in Design,” “History,” “Color,” “The Coleoptera Mosaics: An Exercise in Color,” “Repetition,” “Structure,” “Texture,” “Variations,” “Botanicals,” “Size,” and “Environmental Effects.” From the Publisher This magnum opus presents a comprehensive array of the works of the world’s leading bug artist. Christopher Marley sets out the philosophy of design that informs his work. Leafing through the book takes you on a guided tour of the globe’s most exotic bugs. The colors are entirely natural, and to render the reproductions as accurate as possible some have been reproduced with fifth-color metallic inks and highlighted with spot varnish. About the Author Christopher Marley was born in Covina, California, and grew up near Salem, Oregon. At 19 years old, he began his travels while serving as a missionary for two years in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. Upon his return, he balanced studying design at Brigham Young University with extended sabbaticals to work both on and off camera for scores of fashion brands such as Donna Karan, Gucci, and Giorgio Armani. Over more than a decade, his assignments to dozens of countries in Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Americas spawned a passionate drive to share the unending variety of surprising natural artifacts with an unsuspecting public through his artwork. In addition to insects, his mediums of design include fossils, minerals, botanicals, bones, and sea life. His work has been featured in numerous magazines and is sold through hundreds of galleries, stores, and showrooms in the United States and abroad. Product Description At a time when few women were educated or literate and rarely travelled German-born naturalist and artist Maria Sibylla Merian (1647 1717) made history with her studies of insects in Surinam. Trained as a copperplate engraver and watercolorist, she documented the metamorphosis of butterflies, laying the foundation for modern entomology. What Merian observed when breeding native species of butterfly triggered her curiosity, and spurred her to further investigation; the development from ovum, via larva and chrysalis, to adult butterfly was not fully understood in the 17th century. And not every pupa developed into a butterfly, which puzzled Merian for a long time. On seeing a collection of butterflies from Dutch Guiana, modern Surinam, she decided to study tropical flora and fauna, to discover whether the moths and butterflies she saw in collections shared the same life cycle as those she had bred: the egg and caterpillar stage. In 1699 she sailed for South America with daughter Dorothea, the first time any woman had ventured on a journey of exploration on this scale. Having evaluated and categorized her specimens, in 1705 she published her major work Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium, in Dutch and Latin. She made 60 copperplate engravings to illustrate the stages of insect development, arranged around the cultivated and wild plants she had encountered on her travels. With its detailed text and imagery, the Metamorphosis is the first work on the natural history of Surinam. For 17th century Europeans it was an insight into an unknown world. TASCHEN s reprint of a hand-colored first edition copy includes the complete plates with a commentary by Katharina Schmidt-Loske. Merian accomplished a pioneering achievement of the modern age. This publication pays homage to her work and offers readers an opportunity to appreciate her sumptuous engravings.About the Author Katharina Schmidt-Loske studied biology in Münster, Bonn and Frankfurt am Main, with a focus on insects and reptiles, and has worked as a book illustrator. She earned her doctorate at the University of Bonn with a dissertation titled Die Tierwelt der Maria Sibylla Merian (The Fauna of Maria Sibylla Merian), which was published in 2007. Since 2008 is director of the Biohistoricum at the Museum Koenig in Bonn.Butterflies and Blooms Author Carol Armstrong From Library Journal Armstrong (Wildflowers: Designs for Applique & Quilting; Wild Birds: Designs for Applique & Quilting) is an applique artist who specializes in re-creating the world of nature in fabric. Over the years, she has developed techniques that make hand applique more enjoyable, including a simple “lightbox” technique for drawing the applique pattern on the background fabric and a tiny-bias technique for making narrow bias lines like those in most flower stems. This book teaches those techniques and also includes 24 wildflower and 18 insect and other garden fauna patterns, plus nine learning projects. Each design includes a color photo, line drawing templates, and instructions. These lighthearted projects can be done by the beginner but will be better appreciated by those with some hand applique experience. Recommended for large public library and quilting collections.Charming applique designs from the garden! Join applique artist Carol Armstrong for a creative look at the world of nature. Carol shares new designs for flowers and “friends” the wonderful bugs and beasties that bring a garden to life. You’ll want to make every one of these irresistible projects! 9 quilt projects with complete instructions; 24 wildflower patterns, plus 18 insects, frogs, and more, for a total of 42 hand applique designs; Unique background quilting designs enhance your applique work, creating shades and textures; How-tos for Carol’s lightbox applique technique, a no-template method suitable for beginners as well as pros About the Author Carol Armstrong is a professional quilter, teacher, and pattern designer known for her beautiful, lifelike applique designs taken from nature. Carol lives in Shingleton, Michigan.Little Butterflies Stain Glass Coloring Book Author John Green Product Description Boldly outlined drawings on translucent paper depict the Monarch, Red Admiral, Angle Wing, Swallowtail and 4 other butterfly varieties. Follow coloring directions on the inside cover to create lifelike illustrations, then place near light source for exciting stained glass effect. Eight full-page designs printed on translucent paper. Attracting Butterflies Books The following books tell you how to plant your garden to attract not only butterflies, but humming birds and other creatures. There are books that address planting for specific geographical areas, planting using local native plants and how to plant to attract specific butterflies.Attracting Butterflies & Hummingbirds to Your Backyard: Watch Your Garden Come Alive With Beauty on the WingAuthor Sally Roth Review“Attracting Butterflies and Hummingbirds to Your Backyard is another inspiring example of Sally Roth’s work and dedication to backyard nature activities. Her knowledge and presentation in this book are outstanding!”–Bill and Mary Kay Benner, owners of WildBirdsForever.com “Gardeners who follow Sally Roth’s advice are sure to fill their gardens with a rainbow of wings. Sally offers a multitude of fun and inexpensive gardening plans and projects that will entice hummers and butterflies alike.”–Rick Mikula, author of The Family Butterfly Book and Garden Butterflies of North America.Product DescriptionRoll out the welcome mat for butterflies and hummingbirds. Attracting Butterflies and Hummingbirds to Your Backyard reveals the secrets for creating irresistible gardens and a welcoming landscape, which will lure these amazing creatures up close and personal for your enjoyment and wonder. Author Sally Roth knows the best plants, feeders, and water features that appeal to butterflies and hummingbirds, plus she offers an entertaining and insightful guide to butterfly and hummingbird behavior. National Wildlife Federation Attracting Birds, Butterflies & Backyard WildlifeAuthor David MizejewskiFrom Publisher Weekly In this handsome book, Mizejewski, manager of the National Wildlife Federation’s Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program, offers a short guide to creating gardens and yards that promote ecological balance and provide natural habitats for a wide variety of wildllife, birds, butterflies, toads, snakes, bats, bees and necessary predators such as spiders, beetles, owls and hawks. In uncomplicated text accompanied by stunning photographs, he suggests native plants that can be used to attract birds and butterflies and gives simple instructions for family projects, creating attractive bird feeders and stocking them with food; building nesting boxes for birds, butterflies and bats, and houses for frogs, toads and salamanders; making and maintaining birdbaths, drinking areas, ponds and wetland habitats. The most valuable parts of the book are those in which Mizejewski emphasizes the importance of using native plants to maintain the mutual relationships that plants, animals and other living organisms have developed over the millennia and explains how exotic imports can disrupt this balance. His lists of desirable native plants and undesirable exotics are far from comprehensive, but he directs the reader to Web sites where further information is available. The text is brief, but with its 170 color photos, it provides a good starting point for homeowners who want to create attractive natural habitats. The book concludes with instructions for registering wildlife-friendly gardens with the National Wildlife Federation as official Backyard Wildlife Habitat sites.  Review“With beautiful photographs, this book is extremely useful and accessible. It’s a must for anyone interested in increasing the diversity of life in outdoor spaces.”-Holly Shimizu, Executive Director of the U.S. Botanical Garden. Winner of the Publishers Marketing Association’s Ben Franklin Award. “To create your own backyard habitat, you will need no other guide than this book. It is full of practical ideas, clever projects and delightful photographs.”-Valerie Kelsey, President of the National Gardening Association. “…is an excellent book for beginners…” Daily Record (York, PA) Mar 23, 2007 “extensive information on attracting birds, butterflies and sundry creatures to your little piece of paradise.” “The purpose of this book is to teach the reader how to restore or create a wildlife habitat in his/her own yard…” “The projects described are fundamental and elementary, suited for family participation.” “This is a very helpful book for someone who wishes to enhance his/her landscape as a means of attracting wildlife.” Epinions.com (Brisbane, CA) Mar 21, 2007 “…an excellent book….offering plenty of basic advice about providing the four basic needs of wildlife…lots of helpful advice…” Washington Post January 7, 2006 “It is full of practical how-to information to make your yard a wildlife haven…” Daily Progress (Jacksonville, TX) June 05, 2007 “…hundreds of ideas for landscaping that works for people and wildlife, as well as many easy projects to do with children.” Daily JournalProduct DescriptionA backyard can come alive by creating an environment with plants and spaces that attract nature’s most interesting and friendly creatures. Colorful butterflies, uplifting songbirds, and lively toads can enhance the personal garden space, giving pleasure to nature lovers of all ages. National Wildlife Federation’s® Attracting Birds, Butterflies, and Other Backyard Wildlife provides over a dozen step-by-step projects for families to do together, making getting back to nature easy, educational, and fun. Book DescriptionA backyard can come alive by creating an environment with plants and spaces that attract nature’s most interesting and friendly creatures. Colorful butterflies, uplifting songbirds, and lively toads can enhance the personal garden space, giving pleasure to nature lovers of all ages. National Wildlife Federation’s® Attracting Birds, Butterflies, and Other Backyard Wildlife provides over a dozen step-by-step projects for families to do together, making getting back to nature easy, educational, and fun.From the Publisher Attracting Birds, Butterflies, and Other Backyard Wildlife shows homeowners how to fill their yards and gardens with the sights and sounds of nature. Author David Mizewjewski presents simple plans for reintroducing native plants that birds, butterflies, and a whole host of critters can’t resist. He also shows ways of supplementing nature to further entice wildlife to yards and gardens. -170 photos of backyard wildlife habitats and the creatures they attract -17 fun projects that the whole family can enjoy -Tips for obtaining certification of your backyard habitat in the NWF’s Backyard Wildlife Habitat programFrom the Back CoverNWF Attracting Birds, Butterflies and Other Backyard Wildlife Attracting Birds, Butterflies, and Other Backyard Wildlife shows homeowners how to fill their yards and gardens with the sights and sounds of nature. Author David Mizejewski presents simple plans for reintroducing native plants that birds, butterflies, and a whole host of critters can’t resist. He also shows ways of supplementing nature to further entice wildlife to yards and gardens. • 170 photos of backyard wildlife habitats and the creatures they attract • 17 fun projects that the whole family can enjoy • Tips for obtaining certification of your backyard habitat in the NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat program About the AuthorDavid Mizejewski, of Arlington, VA, has worked as a naturalist at nature centers in Georgia and Virginia. He is currently the manager of the National Wildlife Federation’s Backyard Wildlife Habitat program, which teaches people how to provide habitat for wildlife in their yards, gardens, and neighborhoods. Garden Butterflies of North America: A Gallery of Garden Butterflies & How to Attract Them  Author Rick Mikula and Claudia Mikula  From Booklist Mikula, author of Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s Butterfly Garden, offers readers a study of 40 North American butterflies, including swallowtails, brushfoots, whites, sulphurs, skippers, heliconians, blues, hairstreaks, and crescents. Mikula gives details on habitat, diet, size, color (including the color of eggs, caterpillars, and pupa), migration, flight, and mating habits. Included are a color photograph of each butterfly and a list of plants and flowers that attract it. There are chapters on life cycles and on creating a garden to attract butterflies, including a region-by-region list of food and cover plants to entice them and a list of herbs and the butterflies they attract. There is also a guide to the most popular gardens and zoos where butterflies can be studied. The Nature Book Society, National Wildlife Federation, and Organic Gardening book clubs will feature Garden Butterflies as one of their selections. George Cohen –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.ReviewFor most people, the mention of butterflies immediately evokes an image of delicate beauty, even if we know little about them. Fortunately, Rick Mikula takes our comprehension of the lovely lepidoptera a bit further in his book, Garden Butterflies of North America: A Gallery of Garden Butterflies & How to Attract Them. The various types of butterflies common to North America are explored, along with methods for inviting them into our own backyards. Mikula provides a brief history of the butterfly, explodes the myth of a “butterfly season” (some species hibernate) and discusses man’s fascination with them through the ages. Various Northern species are examined, as are their eating habits and life cycles, the flowers that attract them, the climate they prefer and other intriguing patterns. A thorough profile is provided for each butterfly, with a list of suggested plants to grow for attracting them to the home garden. Garden Butterflies of North America is as absorbing in content as it is pleasing to the eye, and provides a better understanding and deeper appreciation for these winged creatures. — From Independent Publisher –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Product Description The successful Garden Butterflies of North America is now available in a softcover edition, making the vivid color portfolio of 40 of North America’s most treasured and colorful garden butterfly varieties more affordable. Each of the individual butterflies is beautifully photographed in large-format, four-color images that are accompanied by natural history vignettes of the species and information on how to attract them. Illustrated instructions on how to design and manage gardens and backyards to attract butterflies comprises the remainder of the text. Numerous charts and plans for all types of gardens, from a container garden to a full-sized formal garden, specific details on plants that attract butterflies, how-to diagrams for building a butterfly hibernating box, and water sources such as ponds, fountains, mud baths, and waterless ponds are also included. Rick Mikula is the founder of the Hole-In-Hand Butterfly Farm where he’s been breeding and selling butterflies in seven greenhouses since 1980. His work has been profiled in People magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and on the Discovery Channel. In addition, Mikula serves as the butterfly habitat consultant for many universities, zoos, museums, and aviaries. About the Author Rick Mikula is the founder of the Hole-In-Hand Butterfly Farm where he’s been breeding and selling butterflies in seven greenhouses since 1980. His work has been profiled in People magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and on the Discovery Channel. In addition, Mikula serves as the butterfly habitat consultant for many universities, zoos, museums, and aviaries. The Wildlife Habitat Journal – Restoring and Exploring Wildlife Habitat in Your Own BackyardAuthor Betsy S. Franz  Product Description This informative book provides easy steps that every homeowner can take to help restore wildlife habitat in their own backyards while keeping a journal to record their progress.From the Publisher Owning a home has long been the American Dream. But with that dream comes a huge responsibility. Since development is seen as one of the greatest factors contributing to the extinction of wildlife on this planet, the term “home ownership” now needs to carry with it the added role of “habitat ownership.” Every homeowner, whether their home was built last week or decades ago, can share in this role by focusing on their own share of the environment. All it takes is for each property owner to make a few simple changes to help in restoring wildlife habitat in their own yard. Something as simple as planting a native tree for local bird nesting, creating a butterfly garden or choosing to leave a small corner of a yard native instead of opting for 100% lawn helps to restore some of the wildlife habitat that was displaced by a home. As development continues, these preserved habitat areas will become more and more important as safe havens for displaced wildlife. As more and more people begin to accept their role in environmental stewardship, habitat areas will go from being distant oases to nearby stepping stones to connected paths for animals to traverse across an increasingly developed landscape. Can taking care of “your own share” of the environment really make a difference? Some people think it is naive to believe that creating an environmentally friendly landscape will make a difference. But the truth is it is naive to think that it won’t. If each resident planted one native tree, or quit using chemicals so that they could attract birds or butterflies, or even just adjusted their sprinkler heads to quit wasting water, the environment would benefit. Keeping a Wildlife Habitat Journal helps to prove just how quickly those actions DO make a difference. –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. From the AuthorAlthough loss of wildlife habitat is seen as one of the greatest factors contributing to the extinction of wildlife on the planet, Franz believes that getting people to really “get to know” the wildlife in their yards might just change all that. “Someone once told me that the secret to getting people to appreciate nature is to get them to get down and take an eye-to-eye look at it. From my own experience, I know that is true. I see it happen with people all the time. Once people start gardening for wildlife and begin to really LOOK at it – whether it is with a butterfly garden or planting for birds or creating a backyard pond, they seem to gain a whole new appreciation for the wildlife and a whole new sense of responsibility to the environment. They become backyard naturalists without really realizing they are doing it. As more and more people become these do-it-yourself naturalists, it is bound to help the environment.” The Wildlife Habitat Journal was written to encourage people to take that eye-to-eye look. “It’s easy to feel awe when you are in Yellowstone National Park or Muir Woods. But getting people to feel that same way in their own back yards – now that’s a challenge.” –This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition. About the Author Betsy S. Franz is a freelance writer and photographer specializing in the Green movement, nature, wildlife, the environment and both humorous and inspirational human interest topics. She is an avid environmentalist working hard to educate and encourage others to stop and look and appreciate the wonders around them and then learn how to Take Care of Their Share of the planet. Creating a Butterfly Garden  Author Marcus Schneck Product Description Plan a colorful paradise for butterflies in your garden by planting and maintaining the kinds of flowers, shrubs, trees, and other plants that these fluttering beauties will find irresistible. This lovely and practical guide offers a variety of garden plans designed to attract butterflies, and helps you select plants for different stages in their lives, from food plants for caterpillars to nectar plants for adults. As these gorgeous visitors flock to your fragrant garden, you’ll enjoy referring to the butterfly identifier included in Creating a Butterfly Garden. From detailed gardening information to fascinating facts on the life cycles of these winged creatures, here is everything you need to know to let a butterfly sanctuary blossom in your backyard. Marcus Schneck, founder and director of the Backyard Wildlife Association, is a natural history writer and photographers, and the author of several books on butterflies and hummingbirds, including Creating a Hummingbird Garden. He lives in Pennsylvania. Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved. GARDEN BUTTERFLY CONSERVATION Could there be a more mystical way to spend a gentle summer’s afternoon than lolling on a bed of grassy carpet among a jungle of flowering plants and watching wispy wings of bright color flit above us? This spot could be your backyard butterfly garden. Many butterfly species are easily attracted to our gardens. We have been luring these creatures for years with our traditional flower beds, often without a passing thought of the visitors that would eventually bring added coloring to the results of our labors. When we set out to design our gardens with butterflies in mind, filling them with plants and flowers that will attract and nurture the insects, the results can be spectacular. There are generally dozens of species in nearly every region of the continent that will respond, bringing with them a variety of color that is matched by no other group of wildlife. Today across much of North America, the backyard and the garden are the dominant habitat types. Whether intended or not, people are the determining factor in what’s available to much wildlife, butterflies and others. We are now an important element in the conservation of many species. Humankind’s legacy to the butterfly has largely been one of destruction and devastation. Most species are intensely tied to their environments and cannot withstand our ever-growing pressures of development and land consumption. However, in recent years, we have been increasing the space devoted to our gardens, and even specifically to backyard wildlife habitats. In some urban, drought or otherwise inhospitable environments, our gardens help to maintain the local butterfly populations. Some species, such as the more common swallowtails, seem to have responded recently with some very strong population years. One of the most important conservation decisions we can make concerns the use of pesticides, which should be avoided in the butterfly garden. Most of these chemicals are non-selective in the insects that they destroy, be they pests or desirable species like the butterflies. Even some “organic” pest-control methods have been found to be harmful to butterflies. Taylor’s Weekend Gardening Guide to Attracting Birds and Butterflies: How to Plant a Backyard Habitat to Attract   Author Barbara Ellis  Review“Taylor’s Guides are the best, most authoritative guides on the market.” Garden Design –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Product DescriptionNature’s colorful creatures will flock to the yard when you follow the guidelines set forth in this book. Attractive flowers and natural plantings will attract birds and butterflies throughout the season. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.About the Author Barbara Ellis, a former gardening editor at Rodale Press and the publications director of the American Horticultural Society, is the author of many gardening books, including THE RODALE ALL-NEW ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ORGANIC GARDENING and THE BURPEE COMPLETE GARDENER as well as several TAYLOR’S WEEKEND GARDENING GUIDES. She resides in Alburtis, Pennsylvania. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.  Butterfly Life Cycle BooksBelow is a selection of books about the butterfly’s life cycle. Some are factual, one is in the format of a children’s story and several are written specifically for school children.Butterfly Life Cycle BooksBelow is a selection of books about the butterfly’s life cycle. Some are factual, one is in the format of a children’s story and several are written specifically for school children.The Life Cycles of Butterflies From Egg to Maturity   Author Judy Burris and Wayne RichardsFrom Booklist Accomplishing exactly what its title promises, this book describes in text and photos the butterflies that commonly visit gardens in the eastern states. The authors, a sibling team of butterfly and gardening enthusiasts, detail every phase of each species. Beginning with a chapter that looks at the basics of butterfly egg laying, the growth of caterpillars, metamorphosis, and butterfly behavior, the authors move to the heart of the book. With exquisite close-up photography, the eggs, caterpillars, chrysalids, and adults of 23 well-known butterflies are revealed. The reader is treated to the almost architectural forms of eggs; caterpillars that can be striped, spotted, spiny, or smooth; and chrysalids that may be ornamented with flecks of gold or camouflaged to resemble a dead leaf. Adult butterflies are depicted both with wings open and folded. A field notes section for each species supplies photos of host plants and nectar plants, a map of the breeding range, and a life-size silhouette. This tidy book offers the single best resource for photos of the complete life cycle of butterflies.Review “…a remarkable visual resource and guidebook for butterfly lovers of all ages.”— Ethel Fried, Manchester (Conn.) Journal Inquirer, Sept. 30, 2006 (Ethel Fried Manchester (CT) Journal Inquirer ) “A well-written and well-photographed text about how butterflies become beneficial insects.”—Kathy Huber, Houston Chronicle (Kathy Huber Houston Chronicle ) “The dazzling, close-up photos and compelling writing make this easily accessible to young readers…” —Cecilia Goodnow, San Antonio Express-News (Cecilia Goodnow San Antonio Express-News )Product Description For every person who has ever watched and marveled at the magic as a butterfly emerges from a chrysalis, this book is a treasure chest of amazing butterfly transformations. Readers are invited to explore and experience the life cycles of 22 common backyard butterflies, in this unique collection of stunning full color, up-close photography, all taken in a live garden setting. From the Black Swallowtail to the Monarch, the Question Mark to the Painted Lady, each butterfly is shown from start to maturity, with sequential photographs of the egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, and emerging butterfly. Additional detail shots highlight caterpillar behavior, changes in the chrysalis as the wing pattern emerges, open- and closed-wing shots, and the color variations between the male and female butterflies. Authors Judy Burris and Wayne Richards, a brother-and-sister team, tell how they created the ultimate butterfly havens in their own backyards, planting every kind of caterpillar host plant and nectar-producing flower imaginable. With cameras in hand, they set out on a mission to record the lives of all the butterflies that flocked to their gardens. Readers learn how they can create their own butterfly gardens, with specific host plants suggested for each species, most of which are found across North America. This richly visual and highly browsable guide to the life cycles of butterflies will appeal to wildlife enthusiasts, gardeners, school teachers, and families alike.About the Author Judy Burris and Wayne Richards, a brother-sister author team, have been intrigued with butterflies since they were children. They have spent many years observing, raising, and photographing these miraculous creatures. Judy and Wayne live in Erlanger, Kentucky.A Guide to Butterflies: An Overview, Life Cycle, External Morphology, Habits, Defenses Author Stella DawkinsProduct Description This book contains an overview of butterflies, migration, life cycle,polymorphism, external morphology, their defenses, and how butterflies are used in culture. Project Webster represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Commons licensing, although as Project Webster continues to increase in scope and dimension, more licensed and public domain content is being added. We believe books such as this represent a new and exciting lexicon in the sharing of human knowledge.The Life Cycle of a Butterfly  Author Bobbie KalmanFrom School Library Journal Grade 2-4-These books open with a description of the animal or insect, followed by a discussion of the meaning of the term “life cycle.” Then, life stages are highlighted and clearly explained scientifically. How humans are adversely affecting the creatures’ lives and what students can do about it are also discussed. An abundance of clear, colorful, attractively bordered photographs and illustrations enhance the fact-filled texts. These well-written titles will be used for research and pleasure reading. Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TXProduct Description This title is suitable for ages 6 to 12 years. It contains a book and audio CD. A monarch born in the fall has two major challenges! In addition to metamorphosis, these butterflies fly 4,000 miles on a two-way migration trek! This book explains butterfly metamorphosis and migration in simple terms. The text is beautifully illustrated with photographs and art, making this book a joy to read. The topics include: where butterflies lay their eggs; the ‘eating machine’ caterpillar; the transformation from pupa to chrysalis to butterfly; monarch migration; butterfly facts and activity suggestions; and, how to protect butterflies. The CD is a narration of the printed book with entertaining sound effects to guide the reader. Approximate running time: 30 minutes.A Very Magical Caterpillar Tale   Author Audrey RoyProduct Description How do caterpillars turn into butterflies? This beautifully-illustrated picture book explores the life cycle of one of nature’s most magical creatures: the cute, crawly caterpillar who magically transforms into a butterfly. The story begins with a colorful butterfly who lays twelve tiny eggs on a plant. The eggs hatch, and twelve larvae, or baby caterpillars, crawl out and explore the world. The caterpillars eat every leaf in sight, molt a few times, and scare off a hungry bird by clicking and secreting a poisonous liquid. Then, they magically transform into chrysalises. Finally, twelve beautiful butterflies emerge and fill the world with colorful enchantment. Illustrated in bold rainbow colors and filled with cute, whimsical detail, this rhyming tale brings science to life in a fun, delightful way.About the Author Audrey M. Roy is the author and illustrator of A Very Magical Caterpillar Tale: The Story of the Butterfly Life Cycle and Orange Pulp: The Strange and Silly Secret World of Oranges. Her work has been featured in Wired News, The New York Times, Technology Review, and numerous other publications.From Caterpillar to Butterfly   Author Gerald LeggFrom School Library Journal – K – Grade 2 -Two colorful picture books that introduce the life cycles of butterflies and sunflowers. Each volume is broken down into two parts: a narrative comprised of somewhat dry sentences in large type and a double-page fact sheet. Growth outlines are included in each book: from egg through caterpillar to adult butterfly in the first and from seed to full-grown and finally withering sunflower in the second. Illustrations are bright, labeled, and, for the most part, accurate. Scale is occasionally a problem, as in Butterfly where an unrealistically huge spider is shown on the same page as the tiniest of birds. There are no pronunciation guides to help with such words as “germination” and “pupa.” These “life stories” will be most appreciated by children who enjoyed Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar (Putnam, 1981) or Eve Bunting’s Sunflower House (Harcourt, 1996) and who want to know more. Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WIA Monarch Butterfly’s Life  Author John MimmelandFrom School Library Journal K – Grade 2 – The small worlds of two common arthropods are revealed in these vividly illustrated picture stories. Most of the realistic color paintings-one per page-are close-ups, providing a bug’s-eye view of the subject. One or two simple sentences briefly describe each stage of development from the time the animal hatches until it lays eggs of its own. A bit of drama is introduced when the creatures encounter humankind. In Spider, the protagonist barely escapes being sucked into a vacuum cleaner, and on the last page it is shown dangling on a strand of spider silk over the open mouth of a sleeping child. In Butterfly, a migration flight is interrupted when it is caught and then released by a child with a net. A foreword provides the scientific name of the species and miscellaneous facts about its behavior, life span, etc. Each title has a clearly written and logically organized text, but it is the attractive format and cleverly composed illustrations that young readers will most enjoy. Each painting is framed by a triple border with assorted body parts escaping onto the margins, giving the pictures a three-dimensional effect. Gail Gibbons’s Monarch Butterfly (1989) and Spiders (1993, both Holiday) provide more detailed information on anatomy, physical and behavioral characteristics, etc. Faith McNulty’s Lady and the Spider (HarperCollins, 1986) has a more engrossing story line. Still, Himmelman’s eye-catching paintings will appeal to browsers. -Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library –This text refers to the Library Binding edition. Product Description Examines the life cycle of a Nature Upclose: A Monarch Butterfly’s LifeFrom Caterpillar to Butterfly Big BookAuthor Debra HeilimanFrom School Library Journal PreSchool-Grade 1 – Although the drama of metamorphosis has been documented with greater detail in other titles, this presentation stands out because of its classroom setting. The process is seen through the children’s eyes as they experience the excitement of observing the wiggly caterpillar, watch it molt, change into a chrysalis, endure the endless waiting, and stare in wonder as a Painted Lady butterfly emerges and dries its wings. The closing pages show the class at the window watching the insect pause on a flower before flying away to begin the life cycle once again. Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations create a cheerful setting similar in style to those found in Miriam Cohen’s books about classroom events. Close-ups show the stages of transformation as captions wend along plant leaves and stems reminiscent of a caterpillar crawling. A small collection of butterflies commonly found in most parts of the U.S. and a list of addresses of butterfly centers are appended. An inviting book that young children can relate to and one that teachers will find valuable to support nature-study projects. Diane Nunn, Richard E. Byrd Elementary School, Glen Rock, NJ Product Description Where did the caterpillar go? It seems to have disappeared, but it hasn’t. It has turned into a butterfly! From the time a caterpillar first hatches, it eats so fast that its skin can’t keep up. It sheds its skin several times as it grows bigger and bigger. Eventually it forms a shell around itself called a chrysalis. Nothing seems to happen for a long time. But then one day the chrysalis splits open, and a beautiful butterfly emerges. What a magical metamorphosis! About the Author Deborah Heiligman worked as a writer and editor at Scholastic Magazine before becoming a full-time writer. She is also the author of On the Move, illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell. Ms. Heiligman lives in Doylestown, PA. Bari Weissman received her Masters of Art Education from the Massachusetts College of Art. She lives in Boston, MA.The Little ButterflyAuthor Sherry Shanhan Product Description From tiny caterpillar to beautiful butterfly, the life cycle of the monarch unfolds in this fascinating and educational Picture book. The engaging text and realistic photographs follow a little monarch caterpillar as it progresses from the larva stage, through the chrysalis and then becomes a butterfly It then lays eggs that hatch into new caterpillars, starting the amazing process all over again.From the Inside Flap From tiny caterpillar to beautiful butterfly, the life cycle of the monarch unfolds in this fascinating and educational Pictureback. The engaging text and realistic photographs follow a little monarch caterpillar as it progresses from the larva stage, through the chrysalis and then becomes a butterfly It then lays eggs that hatch into new caterpillars, starting the amazing process all over again.Where Butterflies Grow  Author Joanne RyderFrom School Library Journal PreSchool-Grade 2– For young children, there’s no better way to introduce the world of science than through one of nature’s miracles, and it is difficult to find a better example than in this wondrous story of birth and transformation. “Imagine you are someone small. . .” So begins the readers’ journey as a tiny caterpillar embarking on one of life’s odysseys. The story goes through the stages of growth as the egg evolves from birth to the glorious moment when the butterfly takes wing. Through the personalized adventure and Ryder’s strong sensory imagery, readers become the tiny creature, growing and changing. As a wonderful postscript, Ryder gives directions for adapting a part of a garden to attract butterflies. The book is packed with good information presented in an imaginative way. Cherry’s illustrations span the full page, using boxes in sequence to magnify details or follow action. Another special feature of her lush watercolors is the many small creatures hidden among the plant life, inviting readers to sharpen their powers of observation. As it opens children’s eyes to one of the wonders of nature, this book is sure to delight as well as teach. –Virginia E. Jeschelnig, Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library, Willowick, OH–This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.Product Description In a field of lacy leaves, a small caterpillar hatches, grows, and sheds its skin, becoming a smooth, green creeper. It eats and changes some more, then in a sequence of remarkable close-ups, spins a silken sling in which to pupate–until it finally bursts forth as a brilliant black swallowtail butterfly. Includes suggestions on how children can grow butterflies in their own gardens. Color throughout. *************Full color.An Extraordinary Life: The Story of a Monarch Butterfly  Author Laurence Pringle and Bob Marstall From School Library Journal Grade 4-8. Even libraries that already own Ethan Herberman’s The Great Butterfly Hunt (S & S, 1990; o.p.), Kathryn Lasky’s Monarchs (Harcourt, 1993), and Bianca Lavies’s Monarch Butterflies (Dutton, 1993) need this book. It is written as a story, following the life cycle of a female caterpillar (Danaus) from an egg laid in a Massachusetts hayfield to her death in an Arkansas pasture many months and a fantastic migration later. The narrative is scientifically sound and includes information from the most recent research on these familiar aerial flitterers. The attractive, oversized book is lavished with realistic, full-color paintings of Monarchs in all stages of their development and their habitats. Colorful sidebars and a variety of maps are accompanied by informative captions, and the whole is arranged into a particularly appealing, readable, and accurate package. A modicum of anthropomorphism does occur, but it is infrequent and low-key. An effort to avoid an onrushing car or the state of a heavily gravid female Monarch with no milkweed in sight may well be “frantic,” and these slight slippages are unobtrusive. Following the body of the work are chapters on protecting the remaining winter refuges of these feather-light migrants and on raising Monarchs at home or in the classroom. A list of further readings, many of them juvenile titles, and an index complete the harmonious whole. Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NYFrom Booklist Grades 3-6. A map of a monarch butterfly’s migratory route from Massachusetts to Mexico sets the stage for this exceptional book. Rather than giving the usual survey of the habits, habitat, life cycle, and predators of butterflies, Pringle brings immediacy to his subject by focusing sharply on one monarch, whom he names Danaus. Beginning as an egg on the leaf of a milkweed plant, Danaus goes from caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly and makes the long flight to Mexico. There she survives the winter, mates, and flies north to Texas, where she lays her own eggs in a milkweed field. The surprisingly absorbing story of Danaus’ life is followed by a discussion of the monarchs’ endangered winter refuges in Mexico and an explanation of how to raise monarch butterflies from the caterpillar stage. Throughout the book, Marstall’s colorful paintings offer clear, brilliantly colored illustrations of the caterpillars growing, eating, resting, mating, avoiding predators, and flying, flying, flying. An excellent book on a popular species. Carolyn PhelanFrom Kirkus Reviews A migration flight from New England to Mexico and back again would be impressive for a large goose; for a monarch butterfly, it’s nothing short of miraculous. Pringle (Smoking, 1996, etc.) and Marstall capture that miracle in this chronicle of the lifetime of a monarch called Danaus (after its Latin name). Readers follow Danaus on her perilous journey from Massachusetts, slipping through cat paws and struggling with bad weather until she and thousands of other monarchs find their winter homes in Mexico and California. Even there, life is dangerous: Cold weather and predators kill off many monarchs before spring arrives, when they mate, fly north, lay their eggs, and die. Pringle writes simply of all the small, fascinating details that make up the monarch’s life cycle, while illustrations and captions help readers visualize the information, e.g., that delicate gold dots on a monarch’s chrysalis may help disguise the chrysalis from predators by reflecting sunlight like drops of dew, and the caterpillar’s markings warn predators that it eats milkweed, making it poisonous to some. Marstall provides nearly photorealistic views of biological processes, but never neglects the poetic aspect of the information. A superb, well-researched book that finds extraordinary science in the everyday life of a butterfly. (maps, diagrams, further reading, index)Butterfly Painting BooksIn this section, we have books on different techniques for painting butterflies: Oils, acrylics, woodcuttings, watercolors, engraving and decorative art, such as One-Stroke.Butterfly Life Cycle BooksBelow is a selection of books about the butterfly’s life cycle. Some are factual, one is in the format of a children’s story and several are written specifically for school children.The Life Cycles of Butterflies From Egg to Maturity   Author Judy Burris and Wayne RichardsFrom Booklist Accomplishing exactly what its title promises, this book describes in text and photos the butterflies that commonly visit gardens in the eastern states. The authors, a sibling team of butterfly and gardening enthusiasts, detail every phase of each species. Beginning with a chapter that looks at the basics of butterfly egg laying, the growth of caterpillars, metamorphosis, and butterfly behavior, the authors move to the heart of the book. With exquisite close-up photography, the eggs, caterpillars, chrysalids, and adults of 23 well-known butterflies are revealed. The reader is treated to the almost architectural forms of eggs; caterpillars that can be striped, spotted, spiny, or smooth; and chrysalids that may be ornamented with flecks of gold or camouflaged to resemble a dead leaf. Adult butterflies are depicted both with wings open and folded. A field notes section for each species supplies photos of host plants and nectar plants, a map of the breeding range, and a life-size silhouette. This tidy book offers the single best resource for photos of the complete life cycle of butterflies.Review “…a remarkable visual resource and guidebook for butterfly lovers of all ages.”— Ethel Fried, Manchester (Conn.) Journal Inquirer, Sept. 30, 2006 (Ethel Fried Manchester (CT) Journal Inquirer ) “A well-written and well-photographed text about how butterflies become beneficial insects.”—Kathy Huber, Houston Chronicle (Kathy Huber Houston Chronicle ) “The dazzling, close-up photos and compelling writing make this easily accessible to young readers…” —Cecilia Goodnow, San Antonio Express-News (Cecilia Goodnow San Antonio Express-News )Product Description For every person who has ever watched and marveled at the magic as a butterfly emerges from a chrysalis, this book is a treasure chest of amazing butterfly transformations. Readers are invited to explore and experience the life cycles of 22 common backyard butterflies, in this unique collection of stunning fullcolor, up-close photography, all taken in a live garden setting. From the Black Swallowtail to the Monarch, the Question Mark to the Painted Lady, each butterfly is shown from start to maturity, with sequential photographs of the egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, and emerging butterfly. Additional detail shots highlight caterpillar behavior, changes in the chrysalis as the wing pattern emerges, open- and closed-wing shots, and the color variations between the male and female butterflies. Authors Judy Burris and Wayne Richards, a brother-and-sister team, tell how they created the ultimate butterfly havens in their own backyards, planting every kind of caterpillar host plant and nectar-producing flower imaginable. With cameras in hand, they set out on a mission to record the lives of all the butterflies that flocked to their gardens. Readers learn how they can create their own butterfly gardens, with specific host plants suggested for each species, most of which are found across North America. This richly visual and highly browsable guide to the life cycles of butterflies will appeal to wildlife enthusiasts, gardeners, school teachers, and families alike.About the Author Judy Burris and Wayne Richards, a brother-sister author team, have been intrigued with butterflies since they were children. They have spent many years observing, raising, and photographing these miraculous creatures. Judy and Wayne live in Erlanger, Kentucky.A Guide to Butterflies: An Overview, Life Cycle, External Morphology, Habits, Defenses Author Stella DawkinsProduct Description This book contains an overview of butterflies, migration, life cycle, polymorphism, external morphology, their defenses, and how butterflies are used in culture. Project Webster represents a new publishing paradigm, allowing disparate content sources to be curated into cohesive, relevant, and informative books. To date, this content has been curated from Wikipedia articles and images under Creative Commons licensing, although as Project Webster continues to increase in scope and dimension, more licensed and public domain content is being added. We believe books such as this represent a new and exciting lexicon in the sharing of human knowledge.The Life Cycle of a Butterfly  Author Bobbie KalmanFrom School Library Journal Grade 2-4-These books open with a description of the animal or insect, followed by a discussion of the meaning of the term “life cycle.” Then, life stages are highlighted and clearly explained scientifically. How humans are adversely affecting the creatures’ lives and what students can do about it are also discussed. An abundance of clear, colorful, attractively bordered photographs and illustrations enhance the fact-filled texts. These well-written titles will be used for research and pleasure reading. Sandra Welzenbach, Villarreal Elementary School, San Antonio, TXProduct Description This title is suitable for ages 6 to 12 years. It contains a book and audio CD. A monarch born in the fall has two major challenges! In addition to metamorphosis, these butterflies fly 4,000 miles on a two-way migration trek! This book explains butterfly metamorphosis and migration in simple terms. The text is beautifully illustrated with photographs and art, making this book a joy to read. The topics include: where butterflies lay their eggs; the ‘eating machine’ caterpillar; the transformation from pupa to chrysalis to butterfly; monarch migration; butterfly facts and activity suggestions; and, how to protect butterflies. The CD is a narration of the printed book with entertaining sound effects to guide the reader. Approximate running time: 30 minutes.A Very Magical Caterpillar Tale   Author Audrey RoyProduct Description How do caterpillars turn into butterflies? This beautifully-illustrated picture book explores the life cycle of one of nature’s most magical creatures: the cute, crawly caterpillar who magically transforms into a butterfly. The story begins with a colorful butterfly who lays twelve tiny eggs on a plant. The eggs hatch, and twelve larvae, or baby caterpillars, crawl out and explore the world. The caterpillars eat every leaf in sight, molt a few times, and scare off a hungry bird by clicking and secreting a poisonous liquid. Then, they magically transform into chrysalises. Finally, twelve beautiful butterflies emerge and fill the world with colorful enchantment. Illustrated in bold rainbow colors and filled with cute, whimsical detail, this rhyming tale brings science to life in a fun, delightful way.About the Author Audrey M. Roy is the author and illustrator of A Very Magical Caterpillar Tale: The Story of the Butterfly Life Cycle and Orange Pulp: The Strange and Silly Secret World of Oranges. Her work has been featured in Wired News, The New York Times, Technology Review, and numerous other publications.From Caterpillar to Butterfly   Author Gerald LeggFrom School Library Journal K-Gr 2–Two colorful picture books that introduce the life cycles of butterflies and sunflowers. Each volume is broken down into two parts: a narrative comprised of somewhat dry sentences in large type and a double-page fact sheet. Growth outlines are included in each book: from egg through caterpillar to adult butterfly in the first and from seed to full-grown and finally withering sunflower in the second. Illustrations are bright, labeled, and, for the most part, accurate. Scale is occasionally a problem, as in Butterfly where an unrealistically huge spider is shown on the same page as the tiniest of birds. There are no pronunciation guides to help with such words as “germination” and “pupa.” These “life stories” will be most appreciated by children who enjoyed Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar (Putnam, 1981) or Eve Bunting’s Sunflower House (Harcourt, 1996) and who want to know more. Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI A Monarch Butterfly’s Life  Author John MimmelandFrom School Library Journal K-Gr 2-The small worlds of two common arthropods are revealed in these vividly illustrated picture stories. Most of the realistic color paintings-one per page-are close-ups, providing a bug’s-eye view of the subject. One or two simple sentences briefly describe each stage of development from the time the animal hatches until it lays eggs of its own. A bit of drama is introduced when the creatures encounter humankind. In Spider, the protagonist barely escapes being sucked into a vacuum cleaner, and on the last page it is shown dangling on a strand of spider silk over the open mouth of a sleeping child. In Butterfly, a migration flight is interrupted when it is caught and then released by a child with a net. A foreword provides the scientific name of the species and miscellaneous facts about its behavior, life span, etc. Each title has a clearly written and logically organized text, but it is the attractive format and cleverly composed illustrations that young readers will most enjoy. Each painting is framed by a triple border with assorted body parts escaping onto the margins, giving the pictures a three-dimensional effect. Gail Gibbons’s Monarch Butterfly (1989) and Spiders (1993, both Holiday) provide more detailed information on anatomy, physical and behavioral characteristics, etc. Faith McNulty’s Lady and the Spider (HarperCollins, 1986) has a more engrossing story line. Still, Himmelman’s eye-catching paintings will appeal to browsers. -Karey Wehner, San Francisco Public Library –This text refers to the Library Binding edition. Product Description Examines the life cycle of a Nature Upclose: A Monarch Butterfly’s LifeFrom Caterpillar to Butterfly Big BookAuthor Debra HeilimanFrom School Library Journal PreSchool-Grade 1?Although the drama of metamorphosis has been documented with greater detail in other titles, this presentation stands out because of its classroom setting. The process is seen through the children’s eyes as they experience the excitement of observing the wiggly caterpillar, watch it molt, change into a chrysalis, endure the endless waiting, and stare in wonder as a Painted Lady butterfly emerges and dries its wings. The closing pages show the class at the window watching the insect pause on a flower before flying away to begin the life cycle once again. Pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations create a cheerful setting similar in style to those found in Miriam Cohen’s books about classroom events. Close-ups show the stages of transformation as captions wend along plant leaves and stems reminiscent of a caterpillar crawling. A small collection of butterflies commonly found in most parts of the U.S. and a list of addresses of butterfly centers are appended. An inviting book that young children can relate to and one that teachers will find valuable to support nature-study projects.?Diane Nunn, Richard E. Byrd Elementary School, Glen Rock, NJ Product Description Where did the caterpillar go? It seems to have disappeared, but it hasn’t. It has turned into a butterfly! From the time a caterpillar first hatches, it eats so fast that its skin can’t keep up. It sheds its skin several times as it grows bigger and bigger. Eventually it forms a shell around itself called a chrysalis. Nothing seems to happen for a long time. But then one day the chrysalis splits open, and a beautiful butterfly emerges. What a magical metamorphosis! About the Author Deborah Heiligman worked as a writer and editor at Scholastic Magazine before becoming a full-time writer. She is also the author of On the Move, illustrated by Lizzy Rockwell. Ms. Heiligman lives in Doylestown, PA. Bari Weissman received her Masters of Art Education from the Massachusetts College of Art. She lives in Boston, MA.The Little ButterflyAuthor Sherry Shanhan Product Description From tiny caterpillar to beautiful butterfly, the life cycle of the monarch unfolds in this fascinating and educational Pictureback. The engaging text and realistic photographs follow a little monarch caterpillar as it progresses from the larva stage, through the chrysalis and then becomes a butterfly It then lays eggs that hatch into new caterpillars, starting the amazing process all over again.From the Inside Flap From tiny caterpillar to beautiful butterfly, the life cycle of the monarch unfolds in this fascinating and educational Pictureback. The engaging text and realistic photographs follow a little monarch caterpillar as it progresses from the larva stage, through the chrysalis and then becomes a butterfly It then lays eggs that hatch into new caterpillars, starting the amazing process all over again.Where Butterflies Grow  Author Joanne RyderFrom School Library Journal PreSchool-Grade 2– For young children, there’s no better way to introduce the world of science than through one of nature’s miracles, and it is difficult to find a better example than in this wondrous story of birth and transformation. “Imagine you are someone small. . .” So begins the readers’ journey as a tiny caterpillar embarking on one of life’s odysseys. The story goes through the stages of growth as the egg evolves from birth to the glorious moment when the butterfly takes wing. Through the personalized adventure and Ryder’s strong sensory imagery, readers become the tiny creature, growing and changing. As a wonderful postscript, Ryder gives directions for adapting a part of a garden to attract butterflies. The book is packed with good information presented in an imaginative way. Cherry’s illustrations span the full page, using boxes in sequence to magnify details or follow action. Another special feature of her lush watercolors is the many small creatures hidden among the plant life, inviting readers to sharpen their powers of observation. As it opens children’s eyes to one of the wonders of nature, this book is sure to delight as well as teach. –Virginia E. Jeschelnig, Willoughby-Eastlake Public Library, Willowick, OH–This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.Product Description In a field of lacy leaves, a small caterpillar hatches, grows, and sheds its skin, becoming a smooth, green creeper. It eats and changes some more, then in a sequence of remarkable close-ups, spins a sliken sling in which to pupate–until it finally bursts forth as a brilliant black swallowtail butterfly. Includes suggestions on how children can grow butterfiles in their own gardens. Color throughout. *************Full color.An Extraordinary Life: The Story of a Monarch Butterfly  Author Laurence Pringle and Bob Marstall From School Library Journal Grade 4-8. Even libraries that already own Ethan Herberman’s The Great Butterfly Hunt (S & S, 1990; o.p.), Kathryn Lasky’s Monarchs (Harcourt, 1993), and Bianca Lavies’s Monarch Butterflies (Dutton, 1993) need this book. It is written as a story, following the life cycle of a female caterpillar?Danaus?from an egg laid in a Massachusetts hayfield to her death in an Arkansas pasture many months and a fantastic migration later. The narrative is scientifically sound and includes information from the most recent research on these familiar aerial flitterers. The attractive, oversized book is lavished with realistic, full-color paintings of Monarchs in all stages of their development and their habitats. Colorful sidebars and a variety of maps are accompanied by informative captions, and the whole is arranged into a particularly appealing, readable, and accurate package. A modicum of anthropomorphism does occur, but it is infrequent and low-key. An effort to avoid an onrushing car or the state of a heavily gravid female Monarch with no milkweed in sight may well be “frantic,” and these slight slippages are unobtrusive. Following the body of the work are chapters on protecting the remaining winter refuges of these feather-light migrants and on raising Monarchs at home or in the classroom. A list of further readings?many of them juvenile titles?and an index complete the harmonious whole.?Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NYFrom Booklist Gr. 3^-6. A map of a monarch butterfly’s migratory route from Massachusetts to Mexico sets the stage for this exceptional book. Rather than giving the usual survey of the habits, habitat, life cycle, and predators of butterflies, Pringle brings immediacy to his subject by focusing sharply on one monarch, whom he names Danaus. Beginning as an egg on the leaf of a milkweed plant, Danaus goes from caterpillar to chrysalis to butterfly and makes the long flight to Mexico. There she survives the winter, mates, and flies north to Texas, where she lays her own eggs in a milkweed field. The surprisingly absorbing story of Danaus’ life is followed by a discussion of the monarchs’ endangered winter refuges in Mexico and an explanation of how to raise monarch butterflies from the caterpillar stage. Throughout the book, Marstall’s colorful paintings offer clear, brilliantly colored illustrations of the caterpillars growing, eating, resting, mating, avoiding predators, and flying, flying, flying. An excellent book on a popular species. Carolyn PhelanFrom Kirkus Reviews A migration flight from New England to Mexico and back again would be impressive for a large goose; for a monarch butterfly, it’s nothing short of miraculous. Pringle (Smoking, 1996, etc.) and Marstall capture that miracle in this chronicle of the lifetime of a monarch called Danaus (after its Latin name). Readers follow Danaus on her perilous journey from Massachusetts, slipping through cat paws and struggling with bad weather until she and thousands of other monarchs find their winter homes in Mexico and California. Even there, life is dangerous: Cold weather and predators kill off many monarchs before spring arrives, when they mate, fly north, lay their eggs, and die. Pringle writes simply of all the small, fascinating details that make up the monarch’s life cycle, while illustrations and captions help readers visualize the information, e.g., that delicate gold dots on a monarch’s chrysalis may help disguise the chrysalis from predators by reflecting sunlight like drops of dew, and the caterpillar’s markings warn predators that it eats milkweed, making it poisonous to some. Marstall provides nearly photorealistic views of biological processes, but never neglects the poetic aspect of the information. A superb, well-researched book that finds extraordinary science in the everyday life of a butterfly. (maps, diagrams, further reading, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12) Product Description Introduces the life cycle, feeding habits, migration, predators, and mating of the monarch butterfly through the observation of one particular monarch named Danaus. Butterfly Gardening Books The following books tell you how to plant your garden to attract not only butterflies, but humming birds and other creatures. There are books that address planting for specific geographical areas, planting using local native plants and how to plant to attract specific butterflies. Butterfly Gardening: Creating Summer Magic in Your GardenAuthor Smithsonian InstituteProduct Description This revised edition of the classic handbook describes how to attract butterflies and other beneficial and beautiful insects to your garden. It presents everything the gardener needs to know to create intricate, small-scale ecosystems in an urban or suburban setting that can substitute for the rapidly vanishing habitats that are essential to the survival of butterflies. Contributors to this volume include Miriam Rothschild, an eminent entomologist, avid butterfly gardener, and expert in wildflower conservation, who describes the life cycle of butterflies, how and what they see, and how this relates to “gardening with butterflies.” Landscape architect Mary Booth provides imaginative garden designs and easy-to-follow directions for designing and planting. Edward S. Ross, pioneer of close-up nature photography, discusses observing and photographing butterflies. The book also includes a “Master Plant List” of species that attract butterflies, butterfly food plants listed by geographic region, seed and plant resources, a list of gardening and conservation organizations, and a bibliography of books and periodicals about butterflies.From the Inside Flap This new edition of the classic handbook describes how to attract butterflies and other beneficial and beautiful insects to you garden. Butterfly Gardening presents everything the gardener needs to know to create intricate, small-scale ecosystems in an urban or suburban setting that can substitute for the rapidly vanishing habitats that are essential to the survival of butterflies. Contributors to this volume include Miriam Rothschild, an eminent entomologist, avid butterfly gardener and expert in wildflower conservation, who describes the life cycle of the butterfly, how and what they see, and how this relates to “gardening with butterflies.” Landscape architect Mary Booth provides imaginative garden designs and easy-to-follow direction for designing and planting. Edward S. Ross, pioneer of close-up nature photography, discusses observing and photographing butterflies. The book also includes a “Master Plant List” of species that attract butterflies, butterfly food plants listed geographically, seed and plant sources, a list of gardening and conservation organizations, and a bibliography of books and periodicals about butterflies. About the Author The Xerces Society was established in 1971 as a non-profit organization dedicated to the prevention of human-caused extinction of rare invertebrate populations and their habitats. The Society’s efforts include the Monarch Project and publication of Wings, a magazine devoted to the natural history and conservation of butterflies and other invertebrates. A World for Butterflies: Their Lives, Habitats and FutureAuthor Phillip Schappert From BooklistThe term charismatic megafauna is usually reserved for highly visible (and often endangered) mammals, such as tigers or rhinoceros. As Schappert points out in his introduction, butterflies are the charismatic megafauna of the insect world. Their large size and brilliant colors make them obvious to even casual observers, and their occurrence in a wide variety of habitats has interested us for centuries. The author, who studies plant and butterfly interactions, has written a fascinating introduction to these beautiful day-flying insects. The first chapter explains what a butterfly is, the difference between butterflies and their more numerous cousins the moths, and their anatomy. Taxonomy and the butterfly families of the world are covered in the second chapter, with diversity and where they live comprising the third. In many ways, the fourth chapter, on the natural history and behavior of butterflies, is the most fascinating portion of the book and illustrates the complex relationships between butterflies and their environment. The final chapter, on conservation, is an eloquent plea for the continued existence of these most intriguing insects. The book is beautifully illustrated with photos of live butterflies taken in the wild. STARRED REVIEW: Beautifully illustrated with photos of live butterflies… clear and concise writing style, make this book an absolute must. (Nancy Bent Booklist 20000801) Impeccably researched … enjoyable, informative, and indispensable. (Entomological Society of America 20010201) [Schappert’s] lavishly illustrated book provides an introduction to this ephemeral but ubiquitous arthropod. (Nature 20000908) Condenses an immense amount of scientific information about butterflies into a relatively slim volume of lucid prose and vivid photographs. (Gary Clark Houston Chronicle 20001101) Stunningly illustrated … a must for anyone with a fondness for this photogenic insect. (Discover 20001224) Profusely illustrated, detailed look at the world of butterflies, covering virtually every aspect of the insect. (Lynn Van Matre Chicago Tribune ) Product Description Chosen by Booklist (American Library Association) as one of the ‘Top 10 Sci-Tech Books’ in 2000. Butterflies are the most charismatic species of the insect world. Their brilliant colors, ability to fly, complex behavior, ecological relationships with plants and animals, and their broad distribution in a wide variety of habitats have fascinated people for centuries. With over 300 color photographs and drawings, A World For Butterflies is a lavishly illustrated guide to the world of butterflies providing a wide range of information about this colorful and graceful insect. The book is divided into five chapters, each focusing on a major question: What are butterflies? How many kinds of butterflies are there? Where do they live? How do they live? What can we do to help them survive? Among the many topics discussed in detail are evolution, life cycle, courtship and reproduction, anatomy, geographic distribution, migration, demography, as well as butterfly-watching. A World For Butterflies is the first book to feature photographs of butterflies in their natural settings, accompanied by fascinating text, such as: Only one or two out of a hundred eggs will survive to become a butterfly Strategies to deter predators include false eyespots, heads and bright wings that ‘disappear’ when folded up Butterflies without strong anti-predator scent or taste have evolved to look exactly like those that do. Accurate, comprehensive, and beautifully illustrated, this is the ultimate guide to the world of butterflies. From the Publisher Chosen by Booklist (American Library Association) as one of the “Top 10 Sci-Tech Books” in the year ending November 2000. About the Author Phillip Schappert is a charter member of the North American Butterfly Association. He obtained his doctorate in Biology at York University in Toronto and is currently teaching and conducting research in plant/butterfly interactions at the University of Texas in Austin. He is also the editor of the News of the Lepidopterists’ Society and of Passiflora, the publication of Passiflora Society International, and has authored a number of magazine articles and scientific papers about butterflies and plants. Garden Butterflies of North America  Author Rick Mulka From BooklistMikula, author of Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s Butterfly Garden, offers readers a study of 40 North American butterflies, including swallowtails, brushfoots, whites, sulphurs, skippers, heliconians, blues, hairstreaks, and crescents. Mikula gives details on habitat, diet, size, color (including the color of eggs, caterpillars, and pupa), migration, flight, and mating habits. Included are a color photograph of each butterfly and a list of plants and flowers that attract it. There are chapters on life cycles and on creating a garden to attract butterflies, including a region-by-region list of food and cover plants to entice them and a list of herbs and the butterflies they attract. There is also a guide to the most popular gardens and zoos where butterflies can be studied. The Nature Book Society, National Wildlife Federation, and Organic Gardening book clubs will feature Garden Butterflies as one of their selections. George Cohen –This text refers to the Hardcover edition.  Review For most people, the mention of butterflies immediately evokes an image of delicate beauty, even if we know little about them. Fortunately, Rick Mikula takes our comprehension of the lovely Lepidoptera a bit further in his book, Garden Butterflies of North America: A Gallery of Garden Butterflies & How to Attract Them. The various types of butterflies common to North America are explored, along with methods for inviting them into our own backyards. Mikula provides a brief history of the butterfly, explodes the myth of a “butterfly season” (some species hibernate) and discusses man’s fascination with them through the ages. Various Northern species are examined, as are their eating habits and life cycles, the flowers that attract them, the climate they prefer and other intriguing patterns. A thorough profile is provided for each butterfly, with a list of suggested plants to grow for attracting them to the home garden. Garden Butterflies of North America is as absorbing in content as it is pleasing to the eye, and provides a better understanding and deeper appreciation for these winged creatures. — From Independent Publisher –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Product Description The successful Garden Butterflies of North America is now available in a softcover edition, making the vivid color portfolio of 40 of North America’s most treasured and colorful garden butterfly varieties more affordable. Each of the individual butterflies is beautifully photographed in large-format, four-color images that are accompanied by natural history vignettes of the species and information on how to attract them. Illustrated instructions on how to design and manage gardens and backyards to attract butterflies comprises the remainder of the text. Numerous charts and plans for all types of gardens, from a container garden to a full-sized formal garden, specific details on plants that attract butterflies, how-to diagrams for building a butterfly hibernating box, and water sources such as ponds, fountains, mud baths, and waterless ponds are also included. Rick Mikula is the founder of the Hole-In-Hand Butterfly Farm where he’s been breeding and selling butterflies in seven greenhouses since 1980. His work has been profiled in People magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and on the Discovery Channel. In addition, Mikula serves as the butterfly habitat consultant for many universities, zoos, museums, and aviaries. About the Author Rick Mikula is the founder of the Hole-In-Hand Butterfly Farm where he’s been breeding and selling butterflies in seven greenhouses since 1980. His work has been profiled in People magazine, The Wall Street Journal, and on the Discovery Channel. In addition, Mikula serves as the butterfly habitat consultant for many universities, zoos, museums, and aviaries. Ortho’s All About Attracting Hummingbirds and Butterflies  Author Ortho As the authors of this book point out, butterflies and hummingbirds add beauty to the garden. In my opinion, a garden made to sustain these interesting creatures is more than just pretty – it gives something back to nature. This guide describes how to attract butterflies and hummingbirds and provide essentials to keep them around. It offers many practical tips as well as background information on the species. The guide includes charts of plants which will attract and sustain hummers and butterflies throughout their lifespans, suggested garden designs, and an encyclopedia of hummingbird and butterfly species. It does not include color photographs of each plant, but those can easily be found elsewhere. If you would like to devote a whole garden to hummers or butterflies, or just incorporate a few plants to attract them, this book is a good starting place and reference. Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East  Author Carolyn SummersReview “Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East is the most complete publication on the practical challenges associated with native plant gardening and fills this need very well for eastern gardeners. What Carolyn Summers tells us about indigenous plants and wildlife is critical to our sustainable future.” (Douglas Tallamy author of Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants 20091007) “This book is a must-have for anyone interested in the natural history of eastern native plants and their use in gardens. The author combines thorough research with a clear, thoughtful viewpoint gleaned from her own personal experience. Very well written, it is an enjoyable read as well as a valuable tool for garden designers.” (Darrin Duling director, the Native Plant Center 20100401) “Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East is a long overdue, in-depth look at the paucity of indigenous American plants in gardens in the United States, and the importance of correcting this situation. It is an explicit guidebook for garden professionals to enable them to help sustain our wild floral heritage rather than allowing its not-so-slow destruction.” (Ruth Rogers Clausen Co-author of Perennials for American Gardens 20110115) “Beautifully-illustrated, Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East approaches landscape design from an ecological perspective, encouraging professional designers and backyard enthusiasts alike to intensify their use of indigenous or native plants. Emphasizing the importance of indigenous plant gardening and landscape design, Summers provides guidelines for beginning gardeners as well as experienced designers.” (New York Flora Association Newsletter ) “Chock full of interesting facts and figures, Summers approaches design through the lens of ecology making the book unique in its approach and very relevant to anyone creating native gardens for a living.” (Ecological Landscaping Association Newsletter ) Product Description Gardeners, with all good fortune and flora, are endowed with love for a hobby that has profound potential for positive change. The beautifully illustrated Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East approaches landscape design from an ecological perspective, encouraging professional horticulturalists and backyard enthusiasts alike to intensify their use of indigenous or native plants. These plants, ones that grow naturally in the same place in which they evolved, form the basis of the food web. Wildlife simply cannot continue to survive without them-nor can we. Why indigenous plants, you may ask? What makes them so special to butterflies and bees and boys and girls? For Carolyn Summers, the answer is as natural as an ephemeral spring wildflower or berries of the gray dogwood, “As I studied indigenous plants, a strange thing happened. The plants grew on me. I began to love the plants themselves for their own unique qualities, quite apart from their usefulness in providing food and shelter for wildlife.” Emphasizing the importance of indigenous plant gardening and landscape design, Summers provides guidelines for skilled sowers and budding bloomers. She highlights . . . “The best ways to use exotic and nonindigenous plants responsibly “Easy-to-follow strategies for hosting wildlife in fields, forests, and gardens “Designs for traditional gardens using native trees, shrubs, groundcovers as substitutes for exotic plants “Examples of flourishing plant communities from freshwater streams to open meadows “How to control plant reproduction, choose cultivars, open-pollinated indigenous plants, and different types of hybrids, and practice “safe sex in the garden” From Maine to Kentucky and up and down the East Coast, Designing Gardens with Flora of the American East lays the “gardenwork” for protecting natural areas through the thoughtful planting of indigenous plants. Finally we can bask in the knowledge that it is possible to have loads of fun at the same time we are growing a better world. (20091007) –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. About the Author CAROLYN SUMMERS is an adjunct professor for continuing education at Westchester Community College and provides technical assistance to the Native Plant Center, an affiliate of the Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center. –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Gardens for Birds, Hummingbirds, & Butterflies  Author Linda Harris From Library JournalGardeners often want to enhance their gardens by attracting wildlife. Using Briggs’s book, even those with little space can encourage a wide variety of visitors. Briggs’s science background and writing skills make this a worthwhile guide that subtly calls attention to habitat loss while providing meaningful ways gardeners can help. Chapters are organized by habitats: woodlands, wetlands, grasslands, and rocklands. Briggs is thorough, giving brief historical and ecological background on each habitat along with suggestions on how to re-create it at home. Unfortunately, since her book was originally published in Britain, her plant lists may be of limited use to American gardeners. Unlike Briggs, natural history writer Zickefoose, whose work often appears in Bird Watcher’s Digest, includes plant lists for various U.S. regions, though her emphasis is on habitats for birds. There are the usual recommendations on plants and water features, but also included are detailed chapters on housing, feeding, and creating hospitable habitats with living fences, brush piles, and snags. Zickefoose openly discusses the ugly side of attracting birds (disease problems, window-kills, predators, and pests). Points are punctuated by sidebars in which birders relate their experiences. The final chapter comprises observations by naturalists and authors across the United States. Recommended for all public libraries and essential for those lacking Sally Roth’s Attracting Birds to Your Backyard (Rodale, 1998). Harris’s less-detailed book is designed for those who wish to attract birds and butterflies but who have little knowledge of gardening or wildlife. Harris offers beginners a nice section on planning gardens and a short, attractive directory of plants. One strength of this book is its large color illustrations depicting wildlife and illustrating the steps taken in creating such projects as trellises, backyard blinds, and homemade bird feeders. An attractive book recommended for libraries needing to update. Bonnie Poquette, Shorewood P.L., WIProduct Description The spectacular color and motion of hummingbirds, songbirds, and butterflies adds a breathtaking dimension to any garden. This book will show readers how to design and maintain a landscape that will attract these “moving flowers” to the yard. Unlike similar books, which are mostly just catalogs of bird and butterfly species, this new entry to the Black & Decker Outdoor Home series focuses on designing, planting, and caring for a landscape that will attract and sustain birds and butterflies. Also unique are the more than two dozen building projects, such as a post-mounted bird house, that will stimulate retail sales of lumber and other building materials. Gardens for Birds, Hummingbirds & Butterflies includes identification photos of dozens of species of common birds and butterflies, and the plant encyclopedia includes 60 plants that are guaranteed to attract birds, hummingbirds, and butterflies. It also lists trees and grasses attractive to birds and butterflies as sources of nectar, seeds, fruits, and shelter. Features USDA Plant Hardiness Zone maps for all of North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. It also contains a table of common U.S. and metric system measurements, although U.S. measurements are used throughout the book. This great reference includes dozens of step-by-step projects in addition to information on planning and caring for your garden. About the Author The editors of Creative Publishing international have created dozens of best-selling titles in the fields of home repair, home improvement, home decor, and landscaping. Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens: 200 Drought-Tolerant Choices for all Climates  Author Lauren and Scott Ogden Product DescriptionIn recent years, gardeners have faced increased water-use restrictions, and it’s not limited to dry-climate areas like the Southwest. There are restrictions in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. And even for gardeners with no water restrictions, low-water plants are key to a sustainable garden. Waterwise Plants for Sustainable Gardens is a practical guide to the best 200 plants guaranteed to thrive in low-water gardens. Plant entries provide the common and botanical name, the regions where the plant is best adapted, growth and care information, and notes on pests and disease. This practical and inspiring guide includes a variety of plants, from trees to succulents, perennials to bulbs, all selected for their wide adaptability and ornamental value. Companion plants, creative design ideas, and full color photography round out the text. About the Author Garden designers Scott Ogden and Lauren Springer Ogden lecture internationally, emphasizing plant diversity and ecological attunement. Their rich plant palette draws its inspiration from their studies of plants in the wild in the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Europe, and South Africa. They have spoken at most major botanic gardens, public gardens, and arboreta in the United States. This husband-and-wife team’s horticultural experience spans USDA zones 4-10. They have designed gardens and/or gardened professionally in Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming as well as England, Ireland, and Austria. Public projects include gardens at Naples Botanical Garden, Denver Botanic Gardens, Callaway Gardens, and San Antonio Botanical Gardens. Scott and Lauren have written several books in which they pioneer new plants and garden aesthetics. Their latest book, Plant-Driven Design, takes a bold look at garden design from a plant perspective, marrying site, region, plants, and people while both embracing and transcending regionality. Other books include Garden Bulbs for the South (Timber Press 2007), Passionate Gardening (Fulcrum Publishing 2000), The Moonlit Garden (Taylor Publishing 1998), The Undaunted Garden (Fulcrum Publishing 1994), Waterwise Gardening (Prentice Hall 1994), and Gardening Success With Difficult Soils (Taylor Publishing 1992.) The Ogdens and their work have been featured on several television shows and in numerous publications, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Nature, Martha Stewart Living, Sunset, and Horticulture. Awards include two American Horticultural Society book awards and a landscape design award from the Association of Professional Landscape Designers. Before making horticulture and garden design their life’s work, Scott studied geology and paleontology at Yale, and Lauren studied Spanish and Latin American literature at the University of Pennsylvania. She also received a master’s degree in horticulture from Penn State. Passionate gardeners, propagators, plant hunters, fossil hounds, and photographers, Scott and Lauren split their time between a small, jam-packed urban garden in Austin and an expansive naturalistic garden in Fort Collins. They have 5 children, and grow well over 3,000 species and selections of plants. Scott Ogden has prospected for new, garden-adaptable bulbs as well as proven, heirloom varieties in Texas (his home state), the South, Mexico, and beyond. As a horticulturist and designer he consults for and creates public and private gardens across the country. He lives in Fort Collins, Colorado. Butterfly Gardening for the South   Author Gevata Ajilvsqi This is a buy now book for the southern gardener who wants to encourage flocks of butterflies into their garden or who wants to know more about native plants with a butterflies view in mind. The author has extensive color pictures of the butterflies and their habits as well as cultural information about the food plants of the larvae and nectar plants of the adults. She has taken beautiful pictures of the plants, butterflies, caterpillar, and egg stage of almost all the butterflies she details. The information is invaluable. Many butterfly plants are so common as to be considered weeds well many of them are weeds but if you want to grow them and collect them it helps to have a color picture to identify them and cultural information about growing them. She includes layouts for garden design in each of the southern zones covered and gives a lot of good organic practical gardening advice. I especially like the part where she shares her experience on how to take pictures of butterflies. Great stuff for someone who does not know a lot about SLR cameras and wants an insider’s advice on how to take pictures of butterflies. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in gardening with native trees and plants as well as adapted non natives who wish to encourage butterflies in their garden.Landscaping for Wildlife  Author Jeremy Garret Product Description “People want to attract wildlife to their yards for a variety of reasons, but probably foremost among these is that birds and other animals bring us pleasure. The exuberant songs of cardinals and mockingbirds, the playful antics of young squirrels at feeders, and the sight of colorful butterflies dancing above wildflower patches provide us with both daily and lasting joy.”-from Landscaping for Wildlife Written by Jeremy D. Garrett in association with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation (ODWC), Landscaping for Wildlife provides beginners and experts alike with specific, detailed, yet easy-to-follow instructions for meeting water needs, feeding preferences, and nesting requirements of wildlife species found in the southern Great Plains. Garrett also explains how specific plants draw animals to your property by providing food and shelter sources. To assist readers in designing their own “wildscape,” detailed diagrams and plant listings accompany photographs of several ODWC-certified wildscaped properties. A woodworking section includes patterns of nesting and feeding stations designed for individual wildlife species. Garrett’s explanations and advice are complemented by Coral McCallister’s elegant and charming illustrations of wildlife as well as of various habitats and wildscapes. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation manages Oklahoma’s wildlife resources and habitat to provide scientific, educational, aesthetic, economic, and recreational benefits for present and future generations of hunters, anglers, and others who appreciate wildlife. About the Author Jeremy D. Garrett is president of NaTour Communications, a nature consulting firm. Grow a Butterfly Garden: Storey Country Wisdom Bulletin   Author Windy Potter-Springer  Product Description Since 1973, Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletins have offered practical, hands-on instructions designed to help readers master dozens of country living skills quickly and easily. There are now more than 170 titles in this series, and their remarkable popularity reflects the common desire of country and city dwellers alike to cultivate personal independence in everyday life. From the Back Cover Since the 1973 publication of Storey’s first Country Wisdom Bulletin, our commitment to preserving the arts, crafts, and skills of country life has never wavered. We now have more than 200 titles in this series of 32-page publications, and their remarkable popularity reflects the common desire of country and city dwellers alike to cultivate personal independence in everyday life. Storey’s Country Wisdom Bulletins contain practical, hands-on instructions designed to help you master dozens of country living skills quickly and easily. From traditional skills to the newest techniques, Storey’s Bulletins provide a foundation of earth-friendly information for the way you want to live today.Florida Butterfly Caterpillars and Their Host Plants Author Marco MinnoReviewReview“This unique guide helps bring the whole cycle into focus…” — Palatka Daily News, May, 7, 2005 An authoritative guide…Provides all the background information one needs to create a caterpillar-friendly landscape. — Bellaonline.com, October 2005 An excellent book for anyone interested in encouraging butterflies in their landscape. — St. Augustine Record, 6/18/05 If you are a butterfly fancier, this book is a must-have resource. — Palm Beach Post, 8/14/2005 Many books focus on butterflies in Florida, but now the state’s caterpillars are also in the spotlight. — South Dade News Leader, 8/26/2005 The first book of its kind. — Marco Island Sun Times, 7/21/05 The quality of these photos ranges from excellent to outstanding. — Lakeland Ledger, June 17, 2005 Product Description Everything the butterfly gardener or naturalist needs to know about the relationship between caterpillars and the plants that help them turn into butterflies. This book will become the classic guide to southern butterfly caterpillars and their host plants. With hundreds of color photographs and concise information in a format that can easily be carried into the field, it offers an unprecedented tool for all butterfly gardeners, teachers, naturalists, students, and scientists in the southern United States. No other book offers such a comprehensive discussion of Florida butterfly caterpillars and their host plants. It covers caterpillar anatomy, biology, ecology, habitat, behavior, and defense, as well as how to find, identify, and raise caterpillars. The book contains sharply detailed photos of 167 species of caterpillars, 185 plants, 18 life cycles, and 19 habitats. It includes 169 maps. Photos of the egg, larva, pupa, and adult of representatives of 18 butterfly families and subfamilies provide life cycle comparisons that have never been illustrated before in such an accessible reference. Because of Florida’s mild climate and diversity of plants, caterpillars thrive in abundance in the state. Florida’s butterfly fauna consist of temperate species from eastern North America, tropical species from the Caribbean region (including 11 species of exotics that have become established over the last 100 years), and unique races that are found nowhere else. For everyone who has wondered what to do about the caterpillars they find munching on a beloved plant, the authors offer this advice: “Watch them.” Their value in the ecosystem is immense, as they provide vital links in food webs and help to naturally prune their hosts. And they reveal the miracle of metamorphosis, as the worm-like larvae transform into beautiful winged adults. Book Description Everything the butterfly gardener or naturalist needs to know about the relationship between caterpillars and the plants that help them turn into butterflies. “A fantastic guide to Florida’s butterfly caterpillars and their host plants. A comprehensive work on butterfly caterpillars has been needed for a long time. This does an excellent job of filling that need.”–Joseph D. Culin, Clemson University This book will become the classic guide to southern butterfly caterpillars and their host plants. With hundreds of color photographs and concise information in a format that can easily be carried into the field, it offers an unprecedented tool for all butterfly gardeners, teachers, naturalists, students, and scientists in the southern United States. No other book offers such a comprehensive discussion of Florida butterfly caterpillars and their host plants. It covers caterpillar anatomy, biology, ecology, habitat, behavior, and defense, as well as how to find, identify, and raise caterpillars. The book contains sharply detailed photos of 167 species of caterpillars, 185 plants, 18 life cycles, and 19 habitats. It includes 169 maps. Photos of the egg, larva, pupa, and adult of representatives of 18 butterfly families and subfamilies provide life cycle comparisons that have never been illustrated before in such an accessible reference. Because of Florida’s mild climate and diversity of plants, caterpillars thrive in abundance in the state. Florida’s butterfly fauna consist of temperate species from eastern North America, tropical species from the Caribbean region (including 11 species of exotics that have become established over the last 100 years), and unique races that are found nowhere else. For everyone who has wondered what to do about the caterpillars they find munching on a beloved plant, the authors offer this advice: “Watch them.” Their value in the ecosystem is immense, as they provide vital links in food webs and help to naturally prune their hosts. And they reveal the miracle of metamorphosis, as the worm-like larvae transform into beautiful winged adults. About the Author Marc C. Minno, senior regulatory scientist for the St. Johns Water Management District, is the author or coauthor of four other books on butterflies, including Florida Butterfly Gardening: A Complete Guide to Attracting, Identifying, and Enjoying Butterflies (UPF). Jerry F. Butler, professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Florida, is the author of numerous book chapters and articles in the field of medical and veterinary entomology. Donald W. Hall, professor of entomology at the University of Florida, has published widely in the area of insect pathology and field biology. Monarch Migration BooksThe books in this section address mainly Monarch Butterfly migration. There is one book that talks about the migration of other creatures in addition to the Monarch; zebras, crabs, elephants, jellyfish, ants, wildebeests and whales. Another is about Butterfly Watching.     Milkweed, Monarchs and More: A Field Guide to the Invertebrate Community in the Milkweed PatchAuthor Karen Oberhauser and Michael Quinn Editorial Reviews ReviewTeachers that use Journey North or Monarchs in the Classroom will be glad to know of this wonderful new resource — Ina Warren. Brevard, NC, Mon, 31 March 2003, Dplex listserv This handy guide introduces the reader to the kinds of creatures that come and go from the lowly milkweed patch — Journey North, Monarch Butterfly Migration Update: April 11, 2003 Product Description Milkweed, Monarchs and More is a field guide designed to help students, citizen scientists and other milkweed patch enthusiasts in their exploration of this fascinating community. About the Author Ba Rea is a naturalist, illustrator and author who has been raising monarch butterflies and frequenting milkweed patches in New England, Illinois and Pennsylvania for over thirty years. She tends her own milkweed patch in Glenshaw, Pennsylvania, where she lives with her two children, 5 cats, dog and myriads of fascinating “bugs.” Karen Oberhauser is the director of Monarchs in the Classroom and the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project at the University of Minnesota. These programs use monarchs to teach about biology, conservation, and the process of science. She and her students and colleagues have studied monarch biology since 1984. Karen lives in Roseville, Minnesota, with her husband and two daughters. Mike Quinn is an invertebrate biologist for Texas Parks & Wildlife where, among other projects, he coordinates the Texas Monarch Watch. He is also a consultant for the 80 acre NABA Butterfly Park being built near Mission, Texas. Mike holds degrees in Wildlife and Entomology from Texas A&M. He grew up near New Orleans chasing snakes and birding with his parents and currently lives with his wife Gloria in New Braunfels, Texas.The Amazing Monarch: The Secret Wintering Grounds of an Endangered Butterfly Author Windle Turley Product DescriptionIn “The Amazing Monarch,” author and photographer Windle Turley chronicles the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. Replete with page after page of full-color photographs, the book shows the monarch’s rarely captured destination wintering grounds. The contrast of the orange and black pops off the page as the reader goes on a visual tour in the high mountains of Mexico. The multifaceted work also contains poems and quotations focusing on the beauty of these tiny animals that weigh only .02 of an ounce. With carefully researched text and consultation with leading entomologists, “The Amazing Monarch” tracks the monarch’s migration and interesting life spans. Amazingly, this migration only takes place every four to five generations, but somehow, by the last week of October, the returning generation arrives at the same small groups of oyamel fir trees their ancestors populated the year before.The handful of roosting sites, located at about 10,000-feet altitude, each may contain 20 to 30 million monarchs in a single site only a few acres in size. After their stay in Mexico, it is crucial to head north to get back to Texas and Louisiana and specific types of milkweeds to lay their eggs during a critical three-week period. If the monarchs reach their destination too early, frost on the milkweed could kill the eggs. A late arrival may mean the milkweed is no longer succulent. Returning from Mexico, the fourth or fifth generations will now have lived nine months, and before dying, will lay eggs during the last two weeks of March. A female will lay 400 to 500 eggs during her lifetime, and primarily on only one type of milkweed plant, but only a small percentage of eggs will actually survive to become adult butterflies. The offspring of the first generation travel on to Kansas and Tennessee during April where the female will again lay her eggs and die, after having lived only 45 to 60 days. The process continues to South Dakota, Iowa and Wisconsin in May and the Great Lakes and Canada region in June. But the fourth or fifth generation will not breed, lay eggs, or die; instead, they head south in the late summer. Granted almost unprecedented access by Mexican wildlife officials, Turley photographed the insects in their natural habitats at their sanctuaries in Los Saucos near Valle de Bravo, State of Mexico and at the Sierra Chincua Sanctuary near Mineral de Anganguo, State of Michoacan—areas unknown to outsiders until 1975. About the Author For the past 25 years, Windle Turley has traveled the world photographing wildlife, large and small. Orangutans in Borneo, gorillas in Africa, along with polar bears and butterflies, are only a few of the many subjects he has tracked. Exhibits of his works have been praised for their unique composition and character. When Turley is not taking pictures of wildlife he is a practicing trial attorney in Dallas, Texas.Migration: The Biology of Life on the Move  Author Hugh Dingle Review  “. . .an excellent introduction to current ideas and concepts concerning the promotion and maintenance of a wide range of movement patterns.”–IBIS “This is an interesting and thought provoking book in which the author successfully accomplishes his primary aim of generating a comparative survey of migratory behavior. . . Perhaps most important, the author also successfully integrates the dizzying array of definitions and key terms, both conceptual and operational, that comprise this field. Migration by Hugh Dingle is first-rate and should prove to be a valuable reference to students and researchers alike, regardless of taxonomic bias.”–American Zoologist “The book is well written and illustrated, provides a coherent approach to movement patterns, addresses the major topic areas, and suggests areas for future research.” –Quarterly Review of Biology Product Description Migration is one of the most fascinating and dramatic of all animal behaviors. Historically, however, the study of migration has been fragmented, with ornithologists, entomologists, and marine biologists paying little attention to work outside their own fields. This treatment of the subject shows how comparisons across taxa can in fact illuminate migratory life cycles and the relation of migration to other movements; it takes an integrated ecological perspective, focusing on migration as a biological phenomenon. Part One defines migration, gives examples, and places migration in the spectrum of movement behaviors, concluding with a chapter on methods for its study. Part Two focuses on proximate mechanisms, including physiology and morphology (and the constraints associated with them), the interactions between migration and wind and current patterns, and the various orientation and navigation mechanisms by which migrants find their way about. Part Three, on the evolution of migratory life histories, addresses the evolutionary and ecological basis for migration and the roles of migration not only in the lives of organisms, but also in the ecological communities in which they live. Part Four is devoted to a brief consideration of migration and its relation to pest management and conservation. As a major contribution to a vital subject, this work will be valued by all researchers and students in the field of animal behavior, ecology, and zoology.About the Author Hugh Dingle is Professor in the Department of Entomology and Center for Population Biology, University of California, Davis. He is past President of the Animal Behavior Society and has a Ph.D. in Zoology from the University of Mihigan. After postdoctoral research at Cambridge and Michigan, Dingle went to the University of Iowa in 1964, moving to Davis in 1982. He has conducted research on migration in Kenya, Thailand, Australia, the Caribbean, and North America.Great Migrations: Whales, Wildebeests, Butterflies, Elephants, and Other Amazing Animals on the Move   Author Elizabeth Carney  From BooklistAn official companion book to the Great Migrations television series on the National Geographic channel, this colorful book offers excellent photos of eight migrating animals: Mali elephants, red crabs, monarch butterflies, golden jellyfish, zebras, army  ants, wildebeests, and sperm whales. On the double-page spreads carrying information, some sentences are printed in standard paragraph form, while others are singled out and printed in uppercase letters, and sometimes in a form more vertical than horizontal. Within those sentences, some words and phrases are further emphasized with the use of still larger type in different colors. Although these visual elements give the pages a dynamic look, they detract from the experience of actually reading the text and absorbing the content. Still, the writing style is often lively, the maps are excellent, and the photos are exceptionally clear and vibrant. Readers enthralled by the TV series may want to have a look. Grades 3-5. –Carolyn PhelanProduct Description Great herds of zebra thundering across the African plain…fragile butterflies traveling unbelievable distances…family groups of whales coursing through the waves. Many kinds of animals make annual migrations, and their stories reveal incredible strength and will to survive. These treks are magnificently documented in Great Migrations, the children’s illustrated companion to the upcoming 7-hour National Geographic television special of the same name. Created for the huge audience of young animal lovers—and for the nation’s schools, where migration is taught as part of the core curriculum—this book spotlights wild creatures of highest interest to children. Action-filled photo spreads deliver immense “wow” appeal as animals vault over obstacles and escape the clutches of predators. Info-graphic spreads pack in the fascinating facts, with at-a-glance information on where, why, and how animals migrate. Throughout the coverage, this timely book addresses the effect of climate change on animal migration—a story that is just now reaching the public, from scientists and other experts who have witnessed alarming trendsLearning From Monarchs   Author Ra Rae Product Description There are as many ways to use monarchs in the classroom as there are teachers interested in giving it a try. Monarchs offer a compelling introduction to insect life cycles, the intricacies ecosystems and food webs, and the balance of nature. They can be the focus of a profound inquiry science project, complete with math and graphing skills, which can connect students with an international community of citizen scientists. They can also be an exciting journaling theme, a catalyst for understanding geography and human culture, a dynamic study in ethics and a wonderful subject for art and design. This text is intended as a starting point for teachers interested in using monarchs in their classrooms. It introduces concepts and information that will be useful as you design your own monarch lessons. About the Author All of her life, Ba Rea has been passionate about the natural world — enjoying, investigating, learning and sharing what she discovers. Ba has researched, drawn, photographed and written about many different plants, animals and natural phenomena. She has worked with a wide variety of organizations, including the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania, Maine Audubon, Audubon Society of New Hampshire, Monarchs in the Classroom, Lifestrands, Ridge2000, Wings of Wonder, ASSET, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, Frick Environmental Center, the Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, and the Anita Purves Nature Center in Urbana, Illinois. Her favorite creatures are monarch butterflies, but praying mantids, toads, American eels, puffins, and whales are all close contenders! Ba has been raising and releasing monarchs since 1970. She has been introducing school children and teachers to them for over 15 years and teaching a course for teachers interested in using monarchs in the classroom since 2000. Ba earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Illinois, in 1979, in an Individual Plan of Study, called Visual Literacy, which combined studies in illustration, educational psychology and natural history. In order to better understand how children learn and how teachers teach, Ba completed an elementary teaching certification program at Chatham College in 1996. She continued her studies at Chatham College, earning her Masters in Children’s and Adolescent Writing (MACAW), with an emphasis on natural history writing, in 2001.Threat to the Monarch Butterfly   Author Rebecca Murcia Product DescriptionThe migration of the monarch butterflies from the United States to the mountains of Central Mexico is one of nature s most fascinating events. Every fall, millions and millions of monarch butterflies fly all the way to the mountain forests of Central Mexico, where they spend the winter clinging to the trees in large groups. In the spring, they make the long trip back to the United States and Canada, to begin the cycle again. Nature lovers, schoolchildren, and scientists are fascinated by the monarch life cycle. They tag the butterflies in gardens and schoolyards, and follow the tender insects flight as they travel to what is for many an unknown country. But the monarch butterflies amazing journey also puts them at risk. Their habitats the milkweed plant of North America and the oyamel forests of Central Mexico are under constant attack. If their habitats should vanish, so too will this delicate creature. About the Author Rebecca Thatcher Murcia graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and worked as a newspaper reporter for fifteen years. She lives with her two sons in Akron, Pennsylvania. Among her other books for Mitchell Lane Publishers are The Civil Rights Movement, E.B. White, and Carl Sandburg. How to Spot Butterflies   Author Patricia Sutton And Clay Sutton Product Description In a recent article, the New York Times Magazine described butterfly watching as the fastest-growing segment of nature recreation. Little wonder – butterflies are beautiful, exotic, interesting, and observable by anyone, virtually anywhere, young or old, urban or rural. Consummate teachers, the Suttons use the same easy-to-understand style that has made both of their previous books in the How to Spot series bestsellers. Taking up where field guides leave off, they reveal which habitats are sure to hold large butterfly populations and which specific host plants attract butterflies. They address how to use binoculars and share the secrets of how to approach a butterfly without scaring it off. Environmentally sensitive and unobtrusive observation is emphasized, not outdated netting and collecting. Exceptional nectar sources, which are feeding grounds for vast numbers of butterflies, are described. Full-color photographs appear throughout. The Suttons’ proven butterfly-watching techniques About the Author Clay Sutton has years of experience as a professional naturalist and teacher. He lives in Cape May, New Jersey. Patricia Taylor Sutton has decades of experience as a professional naturalist and teacher. She lives in Cape May, New Jersey.Chasing Monarchs: Migrating with the Butterflies of Passage  br />Author Robert Pyple Amazon.com Review A long-standing bit of American nature folklore holds that monarch butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains migrate to wintering grounds in California, whereas those east of the Rockies migrate to wintering grounds in Mexico–and that the two classes of monarchs never meet and mix. Robert Pyle, a lepidopterist and nature writer, decided as a matter of curiosity to test the verity of this observation. His loosely conceived experiment took him over much of western North America, from a monarch breeding ground deep in the forests of British Columbia to the pine-clad mountainsides of central Mexico. His long journey forms the narrative frame for the aptly titled Chasing Monarchs, a book that mixes literate, and often funny, travelogue with the natural history of Danaus plexippus and its relatives. Pyle takes his readers along countless dirt roads, forest paths, cliffs, and milkweed-lined meadows to follow his quest, which he describes with plain elegance: “I’ll find a monarch. I will watch it. If it flies, I’ll follow it as far as I can. When I lose it, I’ll take its vanishing bearing–the direction in which it disappears. Then I will quarter the countryside, by foot and by road, until I find the next suitable habitat along that bearing, and do it again.” The landscape changes constantly in Pyle’s quest, keeping things interesting, and Pyle imparts his evident, abundant affection for butterflies to his readers, a contagiously joyful interest that they come to share as his story progresses. –Gregory McNamee –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Publishers Weekly Scientists know that monarch butterflies migrate thousands of miles each year between northern parts of the U.S. and Mexico or California, but no one has actually seen how they do it. So ecologist Pyle (Where Bigfoot Walks) decided to try. His method: to find individual butterflies at their northernmost habitat, follow them as far as possible, then repeat the process with other individual butterflies along the southward route. Amazingly, this haphazard approach worked. Pyle began near the Canadian border, at the Columbia River, and followed monarchs to the Mexican borderAcovering 9462 miles in 57 days and proving that western monarchs do not all migrate to California, as commonly believed. Though Pyle’s account of his rambling trip suggests that much of it must have been more fun to live through than to read about, he enlivens uneventful sections with butterfly arcana, humorous reminiscences and rueful observations on the environmental impact of cattle ranching, pesticides, dams and jet skis. Pyle’s laid-back humor is appealing, his descriptive talents are often poetic (he remembers monarchs pouring into a Mexican valley “like a heavy orange vapor” in which individuals resembled “flecks of foam and water as they top a waterfall and plunge down into the foaming mass”). His memoir serves both as tribute to this majestic insect and as a thoughtful tour of the contemporary American West. Detailed sectional maps would have enhanced the book’s appeal; endpaper map not seen by PW. (Aug.) FYI: Pyle is currently editing a collection of Vladimir Nabokov’s butterfly writings.  From Library Journal Victorian-era butterfly hunters are often portrayed as genteel aristocrats, but today’s breed, like the author of this book, are gritty, adventurous, and far-wandering. Over two months and across 9000 miles, Pyle tracked and tagged monarch butterflies along their migratory route from northern British Columbia to Mexico. Because he is an ecologist, Pyle gives a solid general account of the state of scientific knowledge of the monarchs and their remarkable travels. Because he is also an award-winning natural history writer, he vividly conveys the lure of the butterflies, the quirky passions of those who study them, and the beauty and diversity of Western landscapes. Not only is this an entertaining work for general readers, but professional entomologists could also mine its observations for clues into the biology and behaviors of monarchs. For all libraries. -AGregg Sapp, Univ. of Miami Lib., Coral Gables, FL  From Kirkus Reviews Pyle (Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Great Divide, 1995, etc.) takes a long, slow ramble with the wanderers, a.k.a. monarch butterflies, ostensibly looking for clues to their far-flung migratory behaviorbut really just having a good time mooching around outdoors. That the monarch engages in the longest, most spectacular mass movement of insects is well known. It journeys from its continent-wide summertime diaspora to its astonishing winter be-ins high in the cool forests of Mexico and the coastal California fog belt. But, Pyle hastily points out, the theory needs some fine-tuning concerning which butterfly populations go to which wintering venue, and he thinks he ought to go look into the question. Thus starts his two-month sabbatical with the monarchs, chronicled here with an enviably laid-back demeanor and an unflagging thrill in simply being outside, walking attentively through the landscape. Monarchs may be his quarry, but seeing that there are precious few of them at the journey’s start, up in British Columbia, Pyle is just as happy with the Mormon metalmarks and Arizona sisters and hackberry emperors, with yellowbelly ponderosa, partridges flushed from fields of peppermint, “a brilliant picture-wing fly with a gemmed thorax.” As he does his easy shuffle to Mexico, he stops to have a good look around and sip a beer, serving as a natural and political historian; he keeps an eye peeled for monarchs on the move while delivering crisp, thoughtful lectures on protective coloration (for monarchs that means not camouflage, but a horn-blast of chromatic orange, reminding predators of their bitterness), orienteering with sun compasses and magnetic fields, or American Indian petroglyphs that have been  “in a stilling act of cultural appropriation.” As for the monarchs, there do appear to be some transmontane migrants, a fact that runs counter to established thinking, although that will require further research. And say, isn’t that a microbrewery over there? Natural history never went down easier. (Author tour) Review “Pyle follows the monarchs’ path… describing the land, the people he meets, and the plants, birds, and animals as precisely as he explicates the wonders of the monarchs’ navigational abilities and endurance, their beauty, and their mystery.” Booklist, ALA “[Chasing Monarchs] serves both as tribute to this majestic insect and as a thoughtful tour of the contemporary American West.” Publishers Weekly “Chasing Monarchs, like all of Bob Pyle’s books, is infused with grace, understanding, and an incredibly expansive knowledge of the world surrounding us.” — David Guterson, author of Snow Falling on Cedars “With a keen eye, kaleidoscopic knowledge, and Nabokovian eloquence, Pyle beguiles us to join him on a 9,500-mile journey following migrating monarch butterflies through the mountains and along the rivers from British Columbia to the Mexican border. Chasing Monarchs is a marvelously rich tapestry of natural and human history.” — Lincoln P. Brower “Robert Pyle is one of America’s exceptional naturalists and one of its finest natural history writers. In this stylishly written book he tracks the monarchs’ spectacular migration from Canada to Mexico, describing not only the creatures that have captured his imagination but also his adventures along the way. Chasing Monarchs is Robert Pyle’s best book yet.” — Sue Hubbell, author of Waiting for Aphrodite and A Country Year “Not only is this an entertaining work for general readers, but professional entomologists could also mine its observations for clues into the biology and behaviors of monarchs. ” Library Journal “[Pyle] set out three years ago…following the migrating monarchs from Canada to Mexico in his old car and with his old butterfly net. His chronicle of that journey is a pleasure: informative, funny, wonderfully absorbing in its curiosity and erudition about the natural world, and even eloquent.” The San Francisco Chronicle “[Pyle’s] delightful anecdotes, thought provoking philosophical questions and personal passion makes this chronicle a potential classic.” Monarch News “If you enjoy the intellectual stimulus of traveling the footsteps of scientists, you’ll like Robert Michael Pyle’s Chasing Monarchs… Enthused by his enthusiasm, we come away with a heightened appreciation of the lives of birds and insect.” America West –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Product Description The monarch butterfly is our best-known and best-loved insect, and its annual migration over thousands of miles is an extraordinary natural phenomenon. Robert Michael Pyle, “one of America’s finest natural history writers” (Sue Hubbell), set out late one summer to follow the monarchs south from their northernmost breeding ground in British Columbia. CHASING MONARCHS tells the engrossing story of his adventurous journey with these graceful wanderers — down the Columbia, Snake, Bear, and Colorado rivers, across the Bonneville Salt Flats, and through the Chiricahua Mountains to Mexico, returning north along the California coast. Part travelogue, part scientific study, CHASING MONARCHS is one of the most fascinating books ever written about butterflies. “[Pyle’s] delightful anecdotes, thought-provoking philosophical questions and personal passion make this chronicle a potential classic” (Monarch News). About the AuthorROBERT MICHAEL PYLE is the author of fourteen books, including Chasing Monarchs, Where Bigfoot Walks, and Wintergreen, which won the John Burroughs Medal. A Yale-trained ecologist and a Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in southwestern Washington. Chasing Monarchs: Migrating with the Butterflies of PassageAuthor Robert Pyple Amazon.com Review A long-standing bit of American nature folklore holds that monarch butterflies west of the Rocky Mountains migrate to wintering grounds in California, whereas those east of the Rockies migrate to wintering grounds in Mexico–and that the two classes of monarchs never meet and mix. Robert Pyle, a lepidopterist and nature writer, decided as a matter of curiosity to test the verity of this observation. His loosely conceived experiment took him over much of western North America, from a monarch breeding ground deep in the forests of British Columbia to the pine-clad mountainsides of central Mexico. His long journey forms the narrative frame for the aptly titled Chasing Monarchs, a book that mixes literate, and often funny, travelogue with the natural history of Danaus plexippus and its relatives. Pyle takes his readers along countless dirt roads, forest paths, cliffs, and milkweed-lined meadows to follow his quest, which he describes with plain elegance: “I’ll find a monarch. I will watch it. If it flies, I’ll follow it as far as I can. When I lose it, I’ll take its vanishing bearing–the direction in which it disappears. Then I will quarter the countryside, by foot and by road, until I find the next suitable habitat along that bearing, and do it again.” The landscape changes constantly in Pyle’s quest, keeping things interesting, and Pyle imparts his evident, abundant affection for butterflies to his readers, a contagiously joyful interest that they come to share as his story progresses. –Gregory McNamee –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Publishers Weekly Scientists know that monarch butterflies migrate thousands of miles each year between northern parts of the U.S. and Mexico or California, but no one has actually seen how they do it. So ecologist Pyle (Where Bigfoot Walks) decided to try. His method: to find individual butterflies at their northernmost habitat, follow them as far as possible, then repeat the process with other individual butterflies along the southward route. Amazingly, this haphazard approach worked. Pyle began near the Canadian border, at the Columbia River, and followed monarchs to the Mexican borderAcovering 9462 miles in 57 days and proving that western monarchs do not all migrate to California, as commonly believed. Though Pyle’s account of his rambling trip suggests that much of it must have been more fun to live through than to read about, he enlivens uneventful sections with butterfly arcana, humorous reminiscences and rueful observations on the environmental impact of cattle ranching, pesticides, dams and jet skis. Pyle’s laid-back humor is appealing, his descriptive talents are often poetic (he remembers monarchs pouring into a Mexican valley “like a heavy orange vapor” in which individuals resembled “flecks of foam and water as they top a waterfall and plunge down into the foaming mass”). His memoir serves both as tribute to this majestic insect and as a thoughtful tour of the contemporary American West. Detailed sectional maps would have enhanced the book’s appeal; endpaper map not seen by PW. (Aug.) FYI: Pyle is currently editing a collection of Vladimir Nabokov’s butterfly writings.  From Library Journal Victorian-era butterfly hunters are often portrayed as genteel aristocrats, but today’s breed, like the author of this book, are gritty, adventurous, and far-wandering. Over two months and across 9000 miles, Pyle tracked and tagged monarch butterflies along their migratory route from northern British Columbia to Mexico. Because he is an ecologist, Pyle gives a solid general account of the state of scientific knowledge of the monarchs and their remarkable travels. Because he is also an award-winning natural history writer, he vividly conveys the lure of the butterflies, the quirky passions of those who study them, and the beauty and diversity of Western landscapes. Not only is this an entertaining work for general readers, but professional entomologists could also mine its observations for clues into the biology and behaviors of monarchs. For all libraries. -AGregg Sapp, Univ. of Miami Lib., Coral Gables, FL  From Kirkus Reviews Pyle (Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Great Divide, 1995, etc.) takes a long, slow ramble with the wanderers, a.k.a. monarch butterflies, ostensibly looking for clues to their far-flung migratory behaviorbut really just having a good time mooching around outdoors. That the monarch engages in the longest, most spectacular mass movement of insects is well known. It journeys from its continent-wide summertime diaspora to its astonishing winter be-ins high in the cool forests of Mexico and the coastal California fog belt. But, Pyle hastily points out, the theory needs some fine-tuning concerning which butterfly populations go to which wintering venue, and he thinks he ought to go look into the question. Thus starts his two-month sabbatical with the monarchs, chronicled here with an enviably laid-back demeanor and an unflagging thrill in simply being outside, walking attentively through the landscape. Monarchs may be his quarry, but seeing that there are precious few of them at the journey’s start, up in British Columbia, Pyle is just as happy with the Mormon metalmarks and Arizona sisters and hackberry emperors, with yellowbelly ponderosa, partridges flushed from fields of peppermint, “a brilliant picture-wing fly with a gemmed thorax.” As he does his easy shuffle to Mexico, he stops to have a good look around and sip a beer, serving as a natural and political historian; he keeps an eye peeled for monarchs on the move while delivering crisp, thoughtful lectures on protective coloration (for monarchs that means not camouflage, but a horn-blast of chromatic orange, reminding predators of their bitterness), orienteering with sun compasses and magnetic fields, or American Indian petroglyphs  “in a stilling act of cultural appropriation.” As for the monarchs, there do appear to be some transmontane migrants, a fact that runs counter to established thinking, although that will require further research. And say, isn’t that a microbrewery over there? Natural history never went down easier. (Author tour) Review “Pyle follows the monarchs’ path… describing the land, the people he meets, and the plants, birds, and animals as precisely as he explicates the wonders of the monarchs’ navigational abilities and endurance, their beauty, and their mystery.” Booklist, ALA “[Chasing Monarchs] serves both as tribute to this majestic insect and as a thoughtful tour of the contemporary American West.” Publishers Weekly “Chasing Monarchs, like all of Bob Pyle’s books, is infused with grace, understanding, and an incredibly expansive knowledge of the world surrounding us.” — David Guterson, author of Snow Falling on Cedars “With a keen eye, kaleidoscopic knowledge, and Nabokovian eloquence, Pyle beguiles us to join him on a 9,500-mile journey following migrating monarch butterflies through the mountains and along the rivers from British Columbia to the Mexican border. Chasing Monarchs is a marvelously rich tapestry of natural and human history.” — Lincoln P. Brower “Robert Pyle is one of America’s exceptional naturalists and one of its finest natural history writers. In this stylishly written book he tracks the monarchs’ spectacular migration from Canada to Mexico, describing not only the creatures that have captured his imagination but also his adventures along the way. Chasing Monarchs is Robert Pyle’s best book yet.” — Sue Hubbell, author of Waiting for Aphrodite and A Country Year “Not only is this an entertaining work for general readers, but professional entomologists could also mine its observations for clues into the biology and behaviors of monarchs. ” Library Journal “[Pyle] set out three years ago…following the migrating monarchs from Canada to Mexico in his old car and with his old butterfly net. His chronicle of that journey is a pleasure: informative, funny, wonderfully absorbing in its curiosity and erudition about the natural world, and even eloquent.” The San Francisco Chronicle “[Pyle’s] delightful anecdotes, thought provoking philosophical questions and personal passion makes this chronicle a potential classic.” Monarch News “If you enjoy the intellectual stimulus of traveling the footsteps of scientists, you’ll like Robert Michael Pyle’s Chasing Monarchs… Enthused by his enthusiasm, we come away with a heightened appreciation of the lives of birds and insect.” America West –This text refers to the Hardcover edition. Product Description The monarch butterfly is our best-known and best-loved insect, and its annual migration over thousands of miles is an extraordinary natural phenomenon. Robert Michael Pyle, “one of America’s finest natural history writers” (Sue Hubbell), set out late one summer to follow the monarchs south from their northernmost breeding ground in British Columbia. CHASING MONARCHS tells the engrossing story of his adventurous journey with these graceful wanderers — down the Columbia, Snake, Bear, and Colorado rivers, across the Bonneville Salt Flats, and through the Chiricahua Mountains to Mexico, returning north along the California coast. Part travelogue, part scientific study, CHASING MONARCHS is one of the most fascinating books ever written about butterflies. “[Pyle’s] delightful anecdotes, thought-provoking philosophical questions and personal passion make this chronicle a potential classic” (Monarch News). About the AuthorROBERT MICHAEL PYLE is the author of fourteen books, including Chasing Monarchs, Where Bigfoot Walks, and Wintergreen, which won the John Burroughs Medal. A Yale-trained ecologist and a Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in southwestern Washington. Butterfly Videos Videos about butterfly migration, metamorphosis, butterfly gardens, sanctuaries and identifying butterflies.   Metamorphosis: The Beauty and Design of ButterfliesProducer Lad Allen Review Metamorphosis follows on the heels of past Illustra offerings, including Privileged Planet, Unlocking the Mystery of Life, and Darwin’s Dilemma. It’s probably true that with these films taken altogether, Illustra producer and documentarian Lad Allen has made the most easily accessible, visually stunning case for intelligent design available. If you have one shot at opening the mind of an uninformed and dismissive friend or family member, the kind who feels threatened by challenges to Darwinism, then presenting him with a copy of a 600-page volume like Signature in the Cell, or even a slimmer alternative like Darwin’s Black Box, would probably be less effective than choosing one of Mr. Allen’s DVDs. Among those, Metamorphosis might well make the best initial selection, since the argument for intelligent design doesn’t come in till the third and final act. When it comes, it’s a soft sell, preceded by a gorgeous, non-threatening nature film that only hints at what’s ahead in Act III. In Act I, the focus is on the mind-blowing magical routine by which the caterpillar enters into the chrysalis, dissolves into a buttery blob and swiftly reconstitutes itself into a completely different insect, a butterfly. A cute graphic sequence shows, by way of analogy, a Ford Model T driving along a desert road. It screeches to a stop and unfolds a garage around itself. Inside, the car quickly falls to pieces, divesting itself of constituent parts that spontaneously recycle themselves into an utterly new and far more splendid vehicle. A sleek modern helicopter emerges from the garage door and thumps off into the sky. In Act II, we follow a particular butterfly, the Monarch, on its journey to a volcanic mountain lodging site in Mexico for the winter, accomplished each year despite the fact that no single, living Monarch was among the cohort that made the trip the year before. Only distant relations — grandparents, great-grandparents — did so. Given the brief life cycle of the insect, those elders are all dead. The Monarch follows the lead of an ingenious internal mapping and guidance system dependent on making calculations of the angle of the rising sun and on magnetic tugs from ferrous metal in the target mountain range. –David Klinghoffer – Evolution News and Reviews Product Description Throughout history butterflies have fascinated artists and philosophers, scientists and schoolchildren with their profound mystery and beauty. In Metamorphosis you will explore their remarkable world as few ever have before. Spectacular photography, computer animation and magnetic resonance imaging open once hidden doors to every stage of a butterfly’s life-cycle. From an egg the size of a pinheadto a magnificent flying insect. It is a transformation so incredible biologists have called it “butterfly magic.” The superbly engineered body of a butterfly is magnified hundreds of times to reveal compound eyes made of thousands of individual lenses, wings covered with microscopic solar panels that warm the insect’s muscles for flight, and navigational systems that unerringly guide Monarch butterflies on their annual migration from Canada to Mexico. How did these extraordinary creatures come into being? Are they the products of a blind, undirected process? Or, were they designed by an intelligence that transcends the material world? Filmed in the rain forests of Ecuador, Mexico’s Trans-Volcanic mountain range, and leading research centers, Metamorphosis is an unforgettable documentary filled with the joys of discovery and wonder. America the Beautiful: The Majestic Nature of God Director Joy Chapman About the Director From the creators of “The Sugar Creek Gang,” “My Christmas Soldier,” and “Mandie and the Secret Tunnel” Product Description Volume Three: Blossoms, Bees, and Butterflies Marvel at the intricate details of wildflowers and the animals that thrive among the blooms. From high mountain peaks to the depths of massive winding canyons, the wonders of Creation are presented with scripture and music to provide a resource that you can re-visit again and again as you seek inspiration or desire a time of quiet meditation. After a fruitless search for relaxing, inspiring nature DVDs free of new age music or narration with an evolutionary slant, a team of filmmakers set out to photograph for themselves the rarely seen and often overlooked intricate details of God’s glorious creation. The result of their efforts is a powerful new DVD series titled America the Beautiful: The Marvelous Nature of God. To capture the splendor and majesty of God’s grand design, the filmmakers trekked to numerous awe-inspiring locations to gather all of the original footage in high definition specifically for this incredible new series. “America the Beautiful: The Majestic Nature of God” makes a wonderful gift. Look for other volumes in this series as well as the soundtrack “The Musical Nature of God.” Butterfly & Moth (Eyewitness DVD) Author DK Publishing From School Library JournalGrade all levels. Spectacular cinematography and fascinating factoids are combined to produce this fast-paced, attention-grabbing nature series that manages to pack a great deal of information into each 30-minute episode. Moving from pre-history to mythology and legend to the latest scientific discoveries, each program covers the gamut of its subject, not in-depth but in breadth. The signature Dorling-Kindersley technique of photographing and filming against a white background and using brilliant color is a visual delight. The filming techniques of zooming and angling, closeups and panoramas, even using the lens as an element by bouncing an acorn from a tree on it or splashing it with droplets of water, keep the eye focused on the subject, while the narrative describes exactly what is being viewed onscreen, allowing viewers to easily absorb the information. Martin Sheen’s soothing voice is calm and clear, giving the illusion of unhurried pacing. The episodes on habitats, such as Arctic & Antarctic, Desert, Pond & River, and Seashore include information on how they came to be formed; the plants and animals inhabiting them; and the effects of wind, rain, and other elements on them. The videos on animals, including Ape, Butterfly & Moth, Shell and Mammal have wonderful footage of these creatures in their own settings. At the conclusion of each episode, “The Making of…” explains how certain effects were created. None of these videos discuss the deleterious effect that humans have had on each of these subjects or the problems of environmental pollution. While that is not the purpose of these programs, which show the beauty of nature unspoiled, perhaps a warning that this beauty can be destroyed so easily would not be amiss here. Overall, the quality of the entire series is consistently excellent. Judith McMahon, Oak Lawn Public Library, IL  Review a high tech whiz-bang … that looks unlike any other … — USA Today an eye-popping odyssey … — New York Newsday visually stunning … — Los Angeles Times Product Description Follow up to the award-winning Eyewitness Video series. Eyewitness is a compelling video series featuring wonders of nature. Viewers will journey into a three-dimensional “virtual museum” where live-action photography creates the sensation of being there. Eyewitness presents a completely different view of the marvels and mysteries of the natural world as they have never been seen before. Spectacular wildlife footage from all over the world takes the viewer to hundreds of places — without leaving the comfort of home. From the Publisher “Eyewitness is really news! The new PBS series shoves nature television into the modern arena, examining in electric half-hour blocks a type of animal, and finding eyewidening ways to reveal the critters’ essences.”-Chicago Tribune 1996 Emmy(r) Award “Outstanding Individual Achieve  The Incredible Journey of the Butterflies Author NOVAEvery year, 100 million monarch butterflies set off on an incredible journey across North America. These beautiful creatures fly 2,000 miles to reach their remote destination: a tiny area high in the mountains of Mexico. Yet scientists are still puzzling over how the butterflies achieve this tremendous feat of endurance-and how, year after year, the monarchs navigate with such hair’s-breadth precision.Without a doubt, this is one of the landmark nature documentaries of its kind. Extremely well photographed and edited, the whole presentation invites and then captures your attention and admiration for some of nature’s most delicate creatures. Excellent for all ages!Indeed, it’s a lovely program about absolutely amazing creatures. As always with NOVA, superbly done. One thing: In two very un-Nova moments, in two segments they use soprano vocal “singing” (over orchestral) that is ear-splitting, spine-slicing, cruelly painful to some of us with sensitive hearing! Yikes! It actually triggers a migraine. Although I’ve watched this episode several times, I still have never heard what Stockard Chaning says about the chrysalis and then in the mating segment because that music is unbearable and I have to mute the volume (and take an Imitrex for migraine). But the other 50 minutes of this Nova episode are wonderful.   Tropical Gardens & Butterflies, DVD Director Tony Helsloot  Imagine walking through tropical gardens with an endless array of colours and beautiful fragrances. Discover many amazing species of butterflies with intricate wing patterns and delight at delicate orchids with their subtle elegance contrasted by the vivid greens of palm leaves. Filmed using many different camera techniques, this DVD allows you to see both the finest details of butterflies as well as wider shots of lush tropical gardens. It has three 10 minute films set to relaxing piano music composed by Simon Daum: Film 1 – Orchids and Butterflies has bright scenes and exquisite orchids and butterflies. Film 2 – Natural Discovery reveals the detail and beauty of nature. Film 3 – Soft Rain shows a refreshing look at tropical flowers. Six further tracks use the sounds of nature: Two 15 minute films have longer shots of tropical gardens with water features and are complemented by the natural sounds of crickets, tropical birds, bubbling streams and small waterfalls, plus four more Natural Decoration tracks show scenes of four different waterfalls in tropical or jungle settings with orchids, koi fish and fresh, green plants. The Tropical Gardens & Butterflies DVD is programmed with many different playback features, so you can play one track continuously, play all the films with music, play just those with natural sounds or play all films in a continuous loop. Please note: Non-profit public screenings of this DVD for churches and for small companies such as in Health Spas, Doctor and Dentist Waiting Rooms, Restaurants and Bars, are allowed at one location, free of extra charge, on up to 4 TV screens up to 40 inches wide. Beginner’s Video Guide to Eastern Butterflies VHS Directors Michael Godfrey and Ken Kaufman Meets the 40 most common eastern butterflies; identifies the true butterflies most frequently seen in the eastern United States; prepares viewer for the inevitable encounter with the more unusual types; learns the taxonomy (organization) and the ecology of the butterflies, their habitats, survival strategies, life cycles and the caterpillar’s food plants; and there’s a special section on gardening for the butterflies. The Story of the ButterflyAmazon Instant Video Review A wonderful little documentary for all ages…features outstanding close-up footage of eggs, caterpillars, cocoons, and fully-formed butterflies as Janet Wantling’s gentle and compelling narration follows the entire life cycle of the Papilio Memnon (Great Mormon Butterfly). Highly Recommended. Three and a half Stars. –Video LibrarianReview There are 20,000 different butterfly species. Most of their life is spent in the caterpillar stage. Fossils indicate that butterflies and moths have been around for at least 50 million years. Survival is precarious for the butterfly at every stage of its life, from egg to caterpillar, and then from chrysalis to butterfly. Presented in easily comprehended stages, the program follows a Papilio Memnon (the Great Monarch butterfly) through its complete life cycle. Viewers learn about their predators, the difference between a cocoon and a chrysalis, winter survival, and their migratory range. One of the most interesting segments relates to the patterns in which adult butterflies lay their eggs, which plants and leaves they select (depending on their species), and the importance of camouflage for butterflies, caterpillars, chrysalis and eggs in avoiding attacks of predators. Some species are protected because they are poisonous or have a bad taste; others are protected by mimicry of those attributes. Butterflies play an important role in spreading pollen for the reproduction of many plants and flowers. Sadly, 10% of butterfly species have gone extinct over the last 200 years. As one of the early predictors for environmental stress, this is alarming. This program includes suggestions for help with local conservation efforts simple things like planting plants that attract butterflies and using safe pesticides. Anyone teacher or parent who wants to teach children about the life cycle of the butterfly or the message of practical conservation will want to view this DVD. Beautiful photography and videography throughout make for a pleasurable learning experience. The photography provides close-up images of actual butterflies in their natural habitats. The graphics provide a visual depiction of the stages of a butterfly s life cycle in easily comprehended drawings. The graphic representations show the details of their body, wings, and antennae. A pleasant musical background enhances the viewing experience. Suitable for K-12 science and library collections. Teachers will find this a very helpful tool for teaching the life cycle of the butterfly. Highly recommended. –Educational Media Reviews OnlineProduct Description From egg to caterpillar, to chrysalis to adult, the life cycle of a butterfly is an amazing story of survival. This educational program tells the amazing story of survival that is the life of a butterfly.What are the predators of butterflies?How do butterflies survive winter?What’s the difference between a chrysalis and a cocoon?Follow our hero, Papilio Memnon (the Great Mormon Butterfly), through its entire lifecycle and learn what dangers threaten its survival at every turn and what an amazing job it does at continuing the species!Learn about many exotic butterflies from far-flung places, and what you can do to help butterflies flourish in your garden at home and help the endangered butterflies of your area.Narration by Janet Wantling Music by Tim Alcock Illustrations by Amanda Hillier Videography by Tom Coffee and Ian Rippey Wasp, Monarch, and Viceroy photographs by Bruce Marlin  On the Wings of the MonarchDirector Oktay Ortabasi Omni Awards,Fall,2003“On the Wings of the Monarch” has been recognized with a Fall 2003 Bronze Omni Award. “…informative and engaging. Recommended.”From the ActorThis new DVD release of “On the Wings of the Monarch” lets you view our best selling documentary in crisp digital high quality audio and video. – The Dreaming TreeAbout the ActorTheir goal is to produce unique, high quality narrative and documentary productions. Their productions remain artistic, rather than commercially driven. Oktay produces, writes, and directs feature films and documentaries. In addition he works as a cinematographer for other directors and has worked as a freelance cameraman for “Ripley’s Believe It or Not” and the Travel Channel and many other clients. Oktay graduated from San Diego State University in 1998 with a BS degree in Television and Film Production and was distinguished with Outstanding Achievement in filmmaking.Product Description“On the Wings of the Monarch” is an exciting nature documentary that follows host Libby Graham on an amazing journey into the life of the monarch butterfly. We travel to an incredible monarch over-wintering site in Mexico where we find close to 40 million monarchs. This documentary provides the viewer with an in-depth look at the enigmatic monarch butterfly, tracing its incredible long distance migration and its fantastic life cycle. “On the Wings of the Monarch” will fascinate children and adults alike. Shot on location in Mexico, Santa Barbara, San Diego, and Kansas, this documentary uses stunning slow-motion photography and brilliant macro photography to capture the beauty and strength of the monarch. It includes informative interviews with monarch expert, Dr. Lincoln Brower. Host Libby Graham and narrator Bernie Alan, PBS voice-over talent, fill the viewers in on all of the interesting facts about the monarch butterfly. Monarch Butterflies & ViolinsDirector Bruce LaneJournal of Ethnomusicology“captures the flavor and nuance of this rich musical style, and compares favorably to the Buena Vista Social Club film.”Product DescriptionA JOURNEY TO THE BUTTERFLIES (26 min), is a visit to the famed Monarch Butterfly Sanctuary of Mexico! Climbing the sanctuary trail at 10,000 feet, we see the Monarchs leave their clusters as the sun warms their wings, then rest on gorgeous flowers to sun themselves before flying down to drink from a shallow stream and to explore the superb fir forest in which they hibernate. Along the way we meet American, Canadian, and Mexican visitors who share their wonder and delight at the unforgettable beauty of the millions of butterflies which surround us.VIVA MI TIERRA CALIENTE (57 min) is the story of famed folk violinist Juan Reynoso, “the Paganini of Mexico.” Don Juan is the last – and perhaps the greatest – of a line of traditional “calentano” violin virtuosos. In the last few years, he and his extraordinary music have gained an enthusiastic following among American violinists.One of them, Paul Anastasio, puts it this way: “It was as if all the musics I’d loved and studied – swing music, and gypsy music, and tango – Cuban this and African that – all of these styles kind of formed the outlines of a puzzle piece that was this music. What can I say? I’m in love!”.And so will you be.  Audubon Butterfly DVD Essentials for Beginners and GardenersActor Clayelle Dalferes Audubon Butterfly DVD Essentials for Beginners and Gardeners has everything the budding lepidopterist needs to begin identifying the common butterflies found across the United States. Included is an easy-to-understand introduction to butterfly biology, butterfly lifecycles and behavior, as well as identification sections covering 30 of our most common species. Each butterfly species has its own favorite foods and habitat which can help attract them to your backyard garden. Essentials contains all the information you’ll need to turn your garden into a butterfly paradise, plus in-depth looks at 25 favorite butterfly plants and many of the butterflies they attract. Essentials for Beginners and Gardeners was written by Paul A. Opler, author of the Peterson Field Guides to Eastern and Western Butterflies, and director Jim Ebner. 0.55 inches tall x 5.35 inches long x 7.45 inches wide Common Butterflies and Skippers of Eastern North AmericaDirectors Richard Walton and Greg DodgeGuy Tudor, President, New York City Butterfly Club“The best introduction to Eastern butterflies.” “Highly recommended.”Product DescriptionEastern butterflies and skippers are diverse and beautiful and this DVD provides the perfect introduction to these colorful insects. Close-up videography and an educational narrative are combined here to introduce you to 70 common butterflies. Learn these and you will easily recognize most of the butterflies in your backyard as well as in local fields and meadows.Both children and adults can share in the fascinating and wonderful world of butterflies and butterfly watching. Now with the help of this DVD you too can learn the butterflies.Included is a special section on monarchs and monarch migration.  Don’t: The Metamorphosis of the Monarch ButterflyMonarch Butterfly DVD Butterfly World – Jewels of the Sky [VHS] (1998)VHS Tape There are more than 165,000 different species of butterflies, each one showcasing grace and beauty. Butterfly World: Jewels Of The Sky is a 35 minute, full color video filmed on location around the globe and presents some of the most spectacular butterflies in nature. Butterflies are show laying, molting, emerging or flying. Their ingenious ways of defense, the great migration of the Monarchs, and much, much more are revealed through spectacular wildlife photography that will delight, fascinate, and inform young viewers. Butterfly World is a highly recommended addition to all school and community library video collections.Caterpillars, Butterflies & MothsDirector New Dimension Media Marvel at the magical change from creepy caterpillar to beautiful butterfly as it emerges from a chrysalis. A variety of caterpillars are shown, and their adaptations for defense, such as sharp spines, hairy bodies, and camouflage, are featured and discussed. Butterflies and moths are shown gathering nectar while the differences between these two insects are explained. A close-up view and description of butterfly wings reveals their intricate structure. Great Migrations: Rhythm of LifeFormat: DVD Featuring the very best footage and spectacular orchestral score of National Geographic’s Great Migrations event, this film brings together images from around the world-filmed over 3 years-resulting in a completely unique, narration-free, musical journey around the world.Great Migrations: Rhythm of Life is a breathtaking ride on the tailwinds of billions of creatures marching, swimming and flying across the planet on death-defying journeys.This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com’s standard return policy will apply.This product is expected to play back in DVD Video “play only” devices, and may not play in other DVD devices, including recorders and PC drives.  Making Butterfly JewelryHere we have books about the history of insects, bugs, beetles and spiders inspiring jewelry design; jewelry makeing, design and collecting; wearable origami art; beading; wire knitting, resin and jewelry created by Native Americans. Jeweled Bugs and Butterflies  Authors Marilyn Nissenson and Susan Jones Amazon.com ReviewTarantulas may be creepy, but not when they’re made of gold, diamonds, and jewel-toned enamel. Wasps, beetles, flies, and bees have all perched on stylish lapels with never so much as a nervous swipe in their direction. The history of jewelry based on insects dates back to the scarabs (dung beetles) of ancient Egypt, worn as amulets for protection in the afterlife. But it wasn’t until the advent of art nouveau at the turn of the 20th century that insect life began to buzz through the fashion world in a big way.Some of the loveliest pieces in Jeweled Bugs and Butterflies are the work of René Lalique, a French artist whose childhood was spent sketching butterflies, wasps, bumblebees, and beetles. He combined a knack for heady atmospheric detail (gold beetles scattered on a carved horn “fern,” a blue glass bee poised on an abalone shell “lily”) with such brilliant enamel techniques as plique-à-jour, a method of suspending enamel between soldered wires to create areas of translucent color.Larded with 127 color illustrations of fabulous–often witty, sometimes over-the-top–bug jewelry, this little gem of a book also offers a sober introduction to the real insect kingdom. There are 750,000 species of these hardy creatures, which adapt themselves to extremes of climate and location, and have proven to be invaluable allies to humans as well as pests. But to date none have joined forces with the sinuous gold female figures of the art nouveau craftsmen: winged images of sex and death that remain one of the most original jewelry motifs. –Cathy CurtisThere is something about insects in art that simultaneously attracts and repels–seductive because of the beauty and aesthetic interpretations, disgusting due to their natural beings. Here, colleagues Nissenson and Jonas (collaborators on Cuff Links [1991], among other art books) have chosen more than 150 of the best-jeweled examples and written a minimalistic text to explain and allure. Their book starts with scarabs from the Tomb of Amenemope and ends with contemporary bugs, beetles, and flying creatures. At the height of luxury are the Art Nouveau photographs, picturing museum-quality objects from Rene Lalique, Louis Comfort Tiffany, and the famed like. All are well labeled, with date, materials, artist, size, and ownership. Enough glitz and glamour for even the most jaded of collectors to be bedazzled.  The Art of Resin Jewelry (DVD) Author Sherri Haab About the AuthorSHERRI HAAB is the bestselling author of The Art of Metal Clay, Designer Style Jewelry, and The Art of Resin Jewelry. Her books for tweens include The Hip Handbag Book, Way to Crochet, and Dangles and Bangles. Her Incredible Clay Book and Nail Art each sold more than 1 million copies. In all, she has more than 2.5 million books in print around the world.  Shared Images: The Innovative Jewelry of Yazzie Johnson & Gail Bird Author Diana Pardue Photographer Craig Smith Gail Bird (Santo Domingo/Laguna) and Yazzie Johnson (Navajo) have been making jewelry together since 1972 and are considered among the first rank of Native American artists. “Shared Images” is a retrospective of their career in the decorative arts, spanning the early 1970s to the present. The jewelry creations of Johnson and Bird are frequently dramatic, always wearable, and compositionally arresting. Their use of non-traditional stones and uncommon juxtapositions of materials has earned them a place in the world of contemporary art alongside the most influential jewelers of their generation. Drawing inspiration from prehistoric pictograph and petroglyph sites, Johnson and Bird have developed a distinctive set of designs that continue to inspire contemporary creations. “Shared Images” emphasizes the forty-six thematic belts that have won the artists well-deserved acclaim at Santa Fe’s annual Indian Arts Market. The book documents Johnson and Bird’s collaborative process and features a range of exemplary pieces shown in museums and galleries across the country. It is published in association with the Heard Museum. Origami Jewelry: More Than 40 Exquisite Designs to Fold and Wear  Author Avako Brodek With precise instructions and vivid, four-color photographs, Ayako Brodek shows readers how to create 40 elegant and unusual pieces of jewelry. Each project includes a list of materials, illustrated step-by-step folding and finishing instructions, a beautiful photo of the completed piece, and suggested color variations, paper designs and embellishments to make each piece exciting and unique.The book opens with sections on choosing paper, equipment, basic folds and bases, and making the piece that then become building blocks for all of the modular and beaded origami jewelry designs featured in the book. There is a section on finishing techniques, followed by the main part of the book, the Directory. Author Ayako Brodek has organized the Directory by seasons and motif, and includes a section of Traditional Japanese Designs as well. Each project is coded by type: (F) Figure; (M) Modular; and (B) Bead.For Spring, readers will learn to make the Butterfly brooch/pendant, hairpin, bracelet and earrings; The Flower Bouquet brooch; and the Chick & Egg brooch/pendant. Summer offers the Sunburst brooch/pendant and matching earrings; the Seashell brooch and earrings; and Beach barrettes. In Fall, there’s the Leaf brooch/pendant and earrings and the Pinecone necklace and earrings; and for Winter, the Festive foil beaded bauble necklace and earrings, and the Star brooch/pendant and earrings. In Traditional Japanese Designs, readers will find favorites like the Crane brooch/pendant, tie tack and earrings; the Kimono brooch/pendant and earrings; and the Paper Fan brooch/pendant and earrings. Knitted Wire Jewelry: Techniques. Projects. Inspiration Author Samantha Lopez Knitting & Wire Combine to Create 25 Gloriously Original Pieces!Distinguished by their fine gauge and delicate beauty, the 25 projects in this book take jewelry-making to fresh and unexpected places. Using knitting to transform cold, hard wire into a moldable, organic fabric, Samantha Lopez creates sophisticated, one-of-a-kind pieces that defy definition.Despite the complex appearance of some of the designs inside, every piece is born from the unconventional and artful combination of very basic techniques, all of which are illustrated in easy-to-follow sequences. So whether you have experience in knitting, jewelry-making or neither, you can create these projects with great success and minimal tools and materials.You’ll find a thrilling range of styles inside: delicate and ultra-feminine, rugged and industrial, vintage-inspired, classic and modern. Create each project as-is, or factor in your own original interpretations, for results sure to WOW!Everything you need to create wearable sculptures!Step-by-step demonstrations of all the basic techniques needed to complete the projects: knitting, stitches, simple increases and decreases, stringing beads and more.25 projects -rings, earrings, bracelets, necklaces – in a breathtaking range of styles.Striking ways to incorporate other materials, including sheet metal, gemstones, silk, velvet and patinas for additional texture opportunities.A simple wire-wrapping process for stronger, more wearable pieces.  More Techniques of Beading Earrings Author Deon Delanque This volume contains all of the basic techniques and step-by-step instructions for making Deon’s Designs Originale Earrings, with new and different designs; it stands alone and builds upon the concepts introduced in Deon’s first book, “Techniques of Beading Earrings”.The book introduces some more complicated designs and then, with more step-by-step instructions that are fully illustrated, builds upon those basics to construct Cylinder Style Earrings, Open Design Earrings; Multi-Dangle Motif; Bugle Bead Earrings without seed beads; Rosette Phase Earrings; two styles of Tipi Earrings; Double Beaded technique; and the Indian Design set. In addition, designs are given for the complete alphabet and the book is full of instructions that are easy to follow and all have been “consumer tested.”There are illustrations, graphs and pictures to insure that even the novice beadworker will be able to create beautiful earrings and matching necklace sets. A Winner!42 illustrations; 27 B&W photographs; 4 pages in full color; 44 beaded earring patterns.  Art of Antique Beading  Author Ondon Staff The Art of Antique Beading is a slim book packed with satisfying ideas, clear and beautiful color pictures, and an easy system that groups similar designs with their instructions. There are 124 different projects, many of them not found in American books (this one is translated from the Japanese.) Bead embroidery on evening bags, barrettes, rings, necklaces, bracelets, brooches, chokers, lariats and combs fill the pages with fresh ideas and new looks that no eager beader could resist.But bring your patience. While the instructions include bead amounts, and the color numbers for Toho and Mill Hill (two brands of Japanese beads) the reader is left to figure out diagrams as obscure as origami folds with little information about the thread (or wire) path. Some beading experience is a must for success. When diagrams are piled four to a page, they are too small except for the sharpest eyes. The accessory page is not helpful, listing “wire and nylon thread” and “beading thread” without a single suggested brand name or source.The patient (and smart) beader will read through a few diagrams first, because the wire size appears in the first of similarly-grouped instructions.The fearless beader will leap right into this book, substituting Nymo for wire, seeing what happens, ignoring unfamiliar Toho numbers and substituting what’s on hand. The best part is fearlessness is well rewarded–the results are lovely, and the pieces delightfully different.  7000 Years of Jewelry  Editor Hugh TaitThe book explores the varied styles, techniques and materials used to make jewelry in many civilizations throughout the world and across the millennia. Egyptian necklaces, Celtic torcs, South American gold masks, Renaissance pendants and Art Nouveau buckles are examples of the range of the masterpieces described and illustrated with 400 superb photographs.7000 Years of Jewelry takes readers on an impressive tour that includes, among other times and places:·                       The Middle East: 5000-2000 BC·                       Egypt: 1500-900 BC·                       Phoenician, Greek, Etruscan and Persian Lands: 850-325 BC·                       China, Celtic Europe, Mexico and Peru: 600 BC-AD 600·                       The Mediterranean, India, Egypt, Roman Britain and Byzantium: 325 BC-AD 600·                       Europe, China, Korea and Japan: 300-1000·                       Mayan Central America: 600-1000·                       Central and South America: 500-1500·                       Europe, Islam, China, Korea and Java: 1000-1500·                       China, India, Tibet and Mongolia: 1500-1850·                       West Africa: 1500-1800·                       Europe: 1500-1950.More comprehensive than before, this reference remains the finest and most beautifully illustrated history of jewelry ever published.  The Complete Jewelry Making Course: Principles, Practice and Techniques: A Beginner’s Course for Aspiring Jewelry Makers  Author Jinks McGrath This comprehensive and heavily illustrated manual teaches the craft of jewelry making to students looking to create professional quality items. The author covers every step of the process, from creating original design concepts to fashioning professionally finished pieces of jewelry. She lists all required tools and equipment, explains their uses, advises on safe working practices, and then guides her readers through every stage of the jewelry making process in a series of carefully structured tutorials. Students will learn–·  How to start with an original idea, translate it into a workable design, and then use the design as a pattern to make beautiful wearable jewelry·  How to work with precious and semiprecious stones, metals, glass, plastic, resin, and wood·  How to present and sell one’s creations to dealers and wholesalers  Clear, full-color, step-by-step photos demonstrate the methods of fashioning metals by heating, hammering, casting, soldering, riveting, polishing, finishing, and adding surface decoration. At-a-glance panels explain how to apply the right techniques when working in specific metals, as well as ideas for experimenting with inexpensive substitutes before advancing to precious materials. Here’s the perfect book for transforming hobbyists into true professionals. It will also serve as a useful textbook for those conducting organized courses in jewelry design. Color photos on every page. Vintage Jewelry Design: Classics to Collect & Wear Author Caroline Cox This gorgeous coffee-table book, with a foreword by influential jeweler Gerda Flöckinger, showcases classic vintage jewelry from the past 100 years. Featuring examples that epitomize the iconic styles of each decade, it offers an overview of the most influential designers (including Tiffany, Cartier, Fabergé, and Chanel), their sources of inspiration, and materials of choice. Photos display a selection of rare and remarkable pieces from museums and private owners, and a vintage shopping guide gives tips on spotting fakes, caring for purchases, and other important facts collectors should know.April 29, 2012 | Filed Under Butterfly Book | Leave a Comment